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π’Œ‰π’‡½
I don't think 'Dhul-Qarnayn' is an allusion to the coins showing Alexander with horns. Why? 1) Apart from one or two examples from early Late Antiquity this period lacks any depiction of a two horned Alexander. 2) The Syriac legend seems to refer to the 4th beast of Daniel.
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π’Œ‰π’‡½ 16 Sep 19
Replying to @DerMenschensohn
3) It seems to be unclear if two or more horns are meant in the legend, thus somehow the Quranic telling ended up with two horns. Coins are not attested for this period. So it is more plausible that it refers to another Daniel passage (8:20): Χ‘Χ’Χœ הקרנים=ذو Ψ§Ω„Ω‚Ψ±Ω†ΩŠΩ†
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π’Œ‰π’‡½ 16 Sep 19
Replying to @DerMenschensohn
What I want so say is: the book of Daniel is sufficent enough to explain the horns both in the Quran and the legend. The coins etc with the 🐐 Alexander are de facto not present in Late Antiquity. Maybe I'm wrong, maybe it's also just nitpicking. Scholars may confirm/debunk this.
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π’Œ‰π’‡½ 16 Sep 19
Replying to @DerMenschensohn
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Syed 17 Sep 19
Replying to @DerMenschensohn
It is almost certain that the dhulqarnain with Yajuj Majuj version in Quran comes from Syriac Alexander Romances.
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π’Œ‰π’‡½ 17 Sep 19
Replying to @gypsy_heart6
No doubt there's a connection, but still there are minor details that are different. The Quran talks about spring instead of a whole deadly sea, that fits perfectly in the Siwa Oasis:
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Islamic Worldview 16 Sep 19
Replying to @DerMenschensohn
If you read the Romance version of Alexander’s life (not the academic standard) it is pretty clear Alexander is Dhul Qarnayn in the Quran. The stories sync up shockingly well. Numerous times in the Romance versions Alexander is described as a monotheist, although not always.
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π’Œ‰π’‡½ 17 Sep 19
Replying to @Ghazzali_Mind
There are in my view minor details that differ from each other but yeah.
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