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David Rozansky
Publisher, Flying Pen Press. Also a writing coach, author's business manager,author of forthcoming Fishnets & Platforms: The Writers Guide to Whoring Your Book.
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David Rozansky 5h
Q from : How much of a turn off is a novel written in first-person present tense?? A: I read the manuscript. Due to its tense, I am in an imperfective aspect. I have no space and no time to imagine the setting. I am annoyed.
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David Rozansky 22h
Q from : FILL IN THE BLANK: A pod of whales. A murder of crows. A __________ of authors. A: The usual term: “A stable of writers.” I might also suggest “a panel of authors.” As novels are often shelved by author, one might say “a stack of novelists.”
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David Rozansky Jan 19
Why, yes, this week’s Weekend runs through the holiday Monday. I will try my best to answer questions from on these topics:
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David Rozansky Jan 19
A to : Chicago Manual is style guide for University of Chicago, a college press primarily of scholastic books. Italics in nonfiction are for book titles and emphasis, but in fiction it’s internal or unspoken dialogue, occasionally emphasis in dialogue.
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David Rozansky Jan 19
A to : As to style for something character reads, depends on what is read. But you can use the same kind of note: [NEWSPAPER HEADLINE STYLE]Dog Bites Boy [NEWSPAPER STYLE]CHICAGO–A dog bit a boy early Tuesday morning.[NORM] Bob hated these stories.
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David Rozansky Jan 19
A to : Use bracketed all-caps typography notes. She came upon a sign on the road: [SIGN STYLE]Danger! Road closed[NORM] She drove onward nonetheless.
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David Rozansky Jan 19
A to : Looking for answer on a couple proofreading things I can’t find clearly in Chicago. For signs, it says to capitalize the first letters. Not italics or all caps like we often see. Is that the same for fiction? Also, reading would still be italics?
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David Rozansky Jan 19
A to : Yes. Virtual Marketing Inc. reached me through my CompuServe postings on the marketing and writing forums. Hired me as Senior Writer that same day. Best writing gig I ever had.
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David Rozansky Jan 19
Q from : Have you EVER had an agent seek you out based on your twitter, your Fiction press account, your fan-fiction, your blog or any other demonstrative writing platform?
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David Rozansky Jan 18
Quote from the in Boise: “We can’t make change if we aren’t in the building.”
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David Rozansky Jan 18
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David Rozansky Jan 17
If there are no more questions, I’ll clock out in about 20 minutes and call it a night. Catch me until then.
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David Rozansky Jan 17
A to : That is a horn worth tooting! There will be the question if that will translate into a platform. Do the players know your name? Do you have a mailing list? Did they buy from you directly?
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David Rozansky Jan 17
Q from : In my query letter, in closing bio, I mention my job (indie games dev). To show I know how to market myself, should I mention my games have had 2.5 million downloads, or does that sound way to far up my own...?
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David Rozansky Jan 17
A to : Any writing you do—query, synopsis, newsletters—should be a showcase of your writing. Publishing professionals will judge every bit of your writing. I would have written: “Make the synopsis a showcase of the story.”
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David Rozansky Jan 17
A to : >> A summary synopsis is used to pass along to others to get a feel for how much time, money and labor is needed for the project, if it’s doable at all. Usually for those who seek movie adaptations and the like.
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David Rozansky Jan 17
A to : It depends on the synopsis’ purpose. A teaser synopsis means to make the reader say: “This is interesting, I gotta read the whole thing.” No ending, make the reader curious and breathless. >>
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David Rozansky Jan 17
Q from : panic! I read in many places a synopsis should be a clear account of the MS with plot step by step, not a place to “showcase your writing skills.” But this contradicts, which is right? Help!
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David Rozansky Jan 17
A to : You can find a directory of publishers and agents in Writers Market, or if you can afford it (or get your local library on it), there’s an international section of agents and publishers at
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David Rozansky Jan 17
RT : Need advice re: publishing. My fiction manuscript is published in the Philippines. But my publisher only owns Philippine rights. What’s the best way to reach out to lit agents to sell international rights?
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