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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl)
Writer. Profe. Chicano. He/him. Pan. Rivera Award. Belpré Honor. Walter Honor. Claudia Lewis Award. Penguin, Tu Books, 5 Puntos. Lit rep: Full Circle Literary.
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 8h
Replying to @readitrealgood
That's...so wrong.
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 8h
Replying to @monitamuchacha
Uh, yes it was. Sometimes they're long, sometimes they're short.
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 8h
Replying to @pumbale
Thanks!!! 🙌🏽🤗
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 11h
No lies detected.
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 11h
Replying to @HillaryMonahan
Wasn't half bad.
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 11h
Replying to @Bryan_Arrg
Yes, and "papa" and "nana."
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 11h
Replying to @DavidOBowles
Addendum. ILots asking, but no, Spanish "tata" doesn't come from Nahuatl. Yes, Nahuatl kids used "tata" to mean daddy. But that's true of many languages. Latin tata Greek τατᾶ Polish tata Quechua tata Sanskrit तात (tātá) Tagalog tata Onomatopoeia, imitating baby babbling.
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 11h
Replying to @JJavierOlivar
Lo que pasa es que el español ya tenía 'tata,' como igual el latín y el griego y un montón de otros idiomas. Es onomatopeya, imitando el balbuceo de los bebés.
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 12h
Replying to @edelamm
Unlikely. Tata existed in Greek, Latin, and most Romance languages before the Conquest. Like "papa" and "mama," it has evolved independently multiple times. It comes from childish babbling and repetition of easy sounds.
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 13h
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 13h
Replying to @DavidOBowles
That stand-in might say to his "child": "Inic timotahmati, inic nimotah." "You see me as your father now, so I am your father." To all of you lucky enough to have some good man be your father when the real one wasn't there, I envy you. Tell that man you love him today. 2/2
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 13h
In Nahuatl, "father" was "tahtli," nearly always used in its possessed form, -tah. So "notah" means "my father." But there was a special verb, too, that meant "to see/know as father." You used it when someone else took the place of a father in your life. Tahmati. 1/2
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 13h
Replying to @MimaWrites
Gracias, querida amiga!
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 15h
Replying to @DavidOBowles
(Note to self: just do a whole thread on 'dios' to make EVEN MORE FRIENDS, hahahaha.)
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 15h
Replying to @DavidOBowles
Addendum 2. The main god of the Indo-European pantheon was Dyḗws Ph₂tḗr, "(day-)sky father." His name evolved into Zeus in Greek & Jupiter in Latin. A variation on the 1st part of his name, "deywós" ("sky being") came to mean "god," evolved into Latin "deus" & Spanish "dios."
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 16h
Replying to @CastilloMarcos7
Yeah, that's human beings for you. We like our stories, and we cling to them no matter what.
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 16h
Replying to @CastilloMarcos7
Papa in that sense is a borrowing from Greek (pápas or páppas, meaning 'daddy,' much like the Romance languages childlike word 'papa').
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 16h
Replying to @VaultAusir
Fair enough. Most linguists see it that way, of course. It's readily understood, however, by anyone who speaks Spanish and has a background in Medieval Spanish as well. I'm able to read transliterated Ladino text pretty easily, though I have to look up some borrowed Hebrew terms.
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 17h
Replying to @DavidOBowles
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David Bowles (Cemānahuacatl) 18h
Replying to @KarlHarkonnen
Shortening of "papá," just like '¡ira!' is a shortening of '¡mira!'
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