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Daniel Miessler β˜•πŸ“š
CRAZY IDEA: If you refuse to move when a flight attendant tells you to get up, you should expect bad things to happen.
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Daniel Miessler β˜•πŸ“š 10 Apr 17
Replying to @DanielMiessler
Absolutely agree that United's mistake should not have resulted in asking people to get off the plane, but THAT should have been the story.
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Daniel Miessler β˜•πŸ“š 10 Apr 17
Replying to @DanielMiessler
When you refuse to get off of a commercial airplane, you've become the problem, not the staff. Two separate issues---don't conflate them.
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Daniel Miessler β˜•πŸ“š 10 Apr 17
Replying to @DanielMiessler
I also agree that this was executed in messed up way, but it sounds like this person thought they were special and didn't need to respond.
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Brian Greer 10 Apr 17
Replying to @DanielMiessler
On another level, the airline did this to get 4 employees into seats. That’s a whole new take on β€œemployee stand-by.”
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Daniel Miessler β˜•πŸ“š 10 Apr 17
Replying to @Tekneek
Agreed, that's HIGHLY messed up. Worthy of a controversy, for sure. But the reason force was used was he refused to get up.
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Brian Greer 10 Apr 17
Replying to @DanielMiessler
Regardless of that, the important part are the decisions made that arrived at that point. At some point, you’d think they’d change strategy.
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Daniel Miessler β˜•πŸ“š 10 Apr 17
Replying to @Tekneek
Right, they could have let him fly, re-routed the other people, and then banned him afterwards.
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Daniel Miessler β˜•πŸ“š 10 Apr 17
Replying to @r13mann @united
100% agree. But if you refuse to do what an attendant tells you to do, on on a commercial airplane, you should expect to be injured.
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Brian Greer 10 Apr 17
Replying to @DanielMiessler
If they desperately had to get that crew to Louisville, I don’t understand why they were banking on β€œstand-by” being good enough.
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Daniel Miessler β˜•πŸ“š 10 Apr 17
Replying to @Trevor_0 @nasboat
Besides the law of obeying attendants on planes?
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Saboteuse 10 Apr 17
Replying to @DanielMiessler
No the airline is the problem.
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Jacob Cordell 10 Apr 17
How about don't overbook the plane?
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Michael Woods 10 Apr 17
Expect to be injured??
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Daniel Miessler β˜•πŸ“š 10 Apr 17
Replying to @Trevor_0 @nasboat
Also, forget about the flight attendants. The police showed up and told him to get up as well. He said no, and grabbed the chair.
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Daniel Miessler β˜•πŸ“š 10 Apr 17
Yeah, it's what happens when you tell cops that you won't do something, and grab the furniture. And flight attendants = cops on planes.
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Daniel Miessler β˜•πŸ“š 10 Apr 17
Again, I completely agree that what United did was wrong. It was asinine. But you should expect bad thigns when you oppose cops on a plane.
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Daniel Miessler β˜•πŸ“š 10 Apr 17
Replying to @natachakennedy
Both. Hence, conflation.
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Michael Woods 10 Apr 17
No, that is not necessarily how such a situation is handled. And flight attendants are not tasked with the same duties as cops. Carry...
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Daniel Miessler β˜•πŸ“š 10 Apr 17
People get booted by marshals for not turning off their phones fast enough. Happens often. Attendants are backed by force, because airplane.
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