Twitter | Search | |
This is the legacy version of twitter.com. We will be shutting it down on 15 December 2020. Please switch to a supported browser or device. You can see a list of supported browsers in our Help Center.
Derek Thompson
It's wild how much the physical world changed in the generation before WWI. In 1880, NYC had no subway, no cars, and the tallest building was a church. In 1915, it had a subway, thousands of cars, a taxi system, the US’s first bike lane, and the world’s 3 tallest skyscrapers.
Reply Retweet Like More
Derek Thompson 15 Jun 19
Replying to @DKThomp
The physical infrastructure of the modern world was "invented" in like 30 years. Like, look at the sub/urban world. What do you see? Cars, car roads, bikes, steel-frame construction, zoned residences, maybe a plane. All of that was invented in one generation!
Reply Retweet Like
Derek Thompson 15 Jun 19
Replying to @DKThomp
Reply Retweet Like
Conor Sen 15 Jun 19
Replying to @DKThomp
Closest analogy we have is probably 1980 media — newspapers, magazines, big 3 TV stations — to today with the Internet.
Reply Retweet Like
Derek Thompson 15 Jun 19
Replying to @conorsen
yep. in a weird way, the physical world was "finished" in 1915, from an invention standpoint. of course, there were innovative tweaks to make buildings taller, cars faster, etc. but so much invention has just moved to other (smaller?) places, like media
Reply Retweet Like
Zeta Zetan 15 Jun 19
Replying to @DKThomp
Reply Retweet Like
Derek Thompson 15 Jun 19
Replying to @ZetaZetan
where is this from??
Reply Retweet Like
Meredith McDonough 15 Jun 19
Replying to @DKThomp
Eric Hobsbawm’s The Age of Empire: 1875-1914 makes gorgeous light of this unfathomable transformation. Highly, highly recommend.
Reply Retweet Like
Derek Thompson 15 Jun 19
Replying to @MCMCD_
LOVE that book
Reply Retweet Like
Peter Merh🥧lz 15 Jun 19
Replying to @DKThomp
Not only that but: electrification the invention of cinema and the distribution of film the popularization of recorded sound the thirty years before World War I probably saw the most rapid sociotechnical change in human history (still)
Reply Retweet Like
Derek Thompson 15 Jun 19
Replying to @peterme
YEP! and air conditioning, and cameras, and sneakers, and sweaters, and Coca Cola, and Einstein's relativity papers, and quantum mechanics ....
Reply Retweet Like