Twitter | Search | |
Catriona Shearer
Maths teacher and fan of geometric puzzles.
3,000
Tweets
1,347
Following
22,811
Followers
Tweets
Catriona Shearer 4h
Replying to @WayneJBurrows
No, me neither yet. Might be because I only sent in my puzzle a couple of hours ago, though!
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer 4h
Replying to @Shackers617
Wow, that’s super cool! Congratulations!
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer 4h
Replying to @WayneJBurrows
If it helps, it’s just over 8 hours from now 😄
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer 4h
Email - the address is in the picture he posted.
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer 4h
Maths night tonight! Who’s joining us?
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer 23h
Ooh, I’ve never tried 1/5. Here’s how I’d do 1/3s:
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer 23h
Didn’t produce a whole load of these recently?
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer Aug 5
Of course (duh!) - thank you. Not sure how I wasn’t seeing that. If you happen to have two equal (consecutive) sides in your right-angled trapezium, can it then always be rearranged to an isosceles one?
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer Aug 5
Can you give an example of one that doesn’t work?
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer Aug 5
Good point. 3-4-5 triangles seemed a good starting point to cook up a counter-example but I hadn’t really thought further along that track.
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer Aug 5
Replying to @DrPMaths
The cynical part of me wonders if this is the reason you named the triangle ABCD instead of just saying ‘any two trapezia with the same side lengths’.
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer Aug 5
Replying to @DrPMaths
Do the sides have to be connected in the same order? Otherwise I can definitely make two (one isosceles, one right-angled) with sides 3,3,5,7. Haven’t thought about the ordered case yet.
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer Aug 4
Replying to @bogotano1950
Have you taken account of the fact that the rectangle covers half of the square?
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer Jul 31
Next Thursday works for me... 😀
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer Jul 31
Replying to @heavymetalmaths
I’m up for that 😄 (I didn’t get a notification about this by the way - which possibly means others tagged in earlier won’t see it either)
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer Jul 31
Good point, I hadn’t thought about doing both. Were you told you had to start at D?
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer Jul 31
It’s made me realise I only ever did this with non-directed networks, so the choice of rows/columns has never mattered. Thinking about it, I’d expect the distance A to B to be in row A, column B, so it makes sense to scan rows here.
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer Jul 30
Does it depend on whether you scan for the nearest neighbour in rows or columns? I was always taught to do columns (which gives your answers) but scanning rows produces the given answer.
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer Jul 30
Replying to @Vanderpere @CodeBoom
Thanks 😊
Reply Retweet Like
Catriona Shearer Jul 30
Replying to @Vanderpere @CodeBoom
Katie, what was the name of the programme you recommended about computing history?
Reply Retweet Like