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Centre for Palaeogenetics
is working on this specimen together with . It's 18 kyrs old! So far, we have sequenced it's genome to 2X coverage. But we still can't say if it's a or a . Maybe it's the common ancestor? More sequencing needed! (Photo: S Fedorov)
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Centre for Palaeogenetics Nov 18
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Grim Nov 20
Where was this found?
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Centre for Palaeogenetics Nov 20
Close to the Indigirka River in NE Siberia
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Ryan McG Nov 18
While you're at it, could you please look into whether it was a good boy?
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Benjamin de Rooij Nov 19
They're all good boys
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Christoffer Olsson Nov 19
Is it common for animals' genomes to change that rapidly? I thought dogs mostly changed because we made them and that their would counterparts would've stayed roughly the same. Can we tell an 18000 year old human from a modern one, for example?
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Ola Lygre Nov 19
Genetic change in nature is often linked to mutations, these happen from one generation to another, and wolves have a shorter time between generation than humans for example, thus allowing for quicker genetic change
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Louis Nov 19
Finally, Seymour has been found!
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Adam Paul Haase. Nov 19
Too soon for that.
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SYZYGON Nov 19
Replying to @CpgSthlm @Qafzeh and 2 others
It's not like the situation with humans and chimpanzees, where both evolved from a common ancestor that no longer exists. The common ancestors of dogs and wolves were (and remain) wolves. Dogs branched off, but wolves continued. That specimen is either a wolf or a very early dog.
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SYZYGON Nov 19
Replying to @CpgSthlm @Qafzeh and 2 others
Although I guess if there were multiple species of wolves, and both dogs and all extant subspecies of wolves evolved from one species that is now extinct, then it would make sense that specimen could be a common ancestor. Is that what is meant here? Awesome specimen.
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