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Edward de Jong
Over 100,000 hours of programming experience. A big fan of Prof. Wirth's languages and films of Ingmar Bergman. Designer of the Beads language. Father of 3.
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Edward de Jong retweeted
meteor shill ☄️ 21h
A monad is just a monoid in the category of endofunctors, what's the problem?
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Edward de Jong retweeted
Stephen Diehl 12h
I don't want 'humanized' applications. I want reliable, offline-first, deterministic software that has its internals and configuration accessible and the responsiveness of a unix utility.
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Edward de Jong Nov 22
Replying to @pavel_bazant
Assembly language May seem clearer at a microscopic level because it’s entirely concrete but the sheer bulk of it obscures the overall intention of the code. A language that promotes brevity without obscuration is the optimal. Java and COBOL are both verbose languages, thus bad
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Edward de Jong Nov 22
Recently a car mag was testing the new Ford F150 with the mild hybrid powertrain. A commenter, noted a comparison with the 1983 Lamborghini Countach which was an exotic sports car in its day, notice how close they are. Basically a Countach with double mileage. Ford is doing good
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Edward de Jong Nov 22
Replying to @orangebook_
Nonsense. I was taught in a book on interviewing to say when asked for your worst flaw, to reply you are impatient, because it can be considered a sign of strong drive. Orange Book must not know very many wealthy people. Most of my wealthiest friends are high energy, lots of pep
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Edward de Jong Nov 21
So I object to being lumped in with the category of mixed bag of weirdos just because I don’t like sitting around in a group with the dumbest idea in the room Gets equal consideration with brilliance. Creativity does not come from large groups. Apple spaceship is proof positive
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Edward de Jong Nov 21
The greatest artists and designers in history were not part of committees that sat around a conference table in an oxygen-deprived room and thought up brilliant stuff. Unfortunately this is what big corporations try to do every day of the week and fail.
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Edward de Jong Nov 21
Replying to @anvaka @npmjs
no better proof that we are not in the era of interchangeable parts yet, than NPM packages, which show a pathetic lack of Lego-ness.
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Edward de Jong Nov 21
Replying to @jonathoda
Absolutely! Many of us view programming as a craft. Something you get better at over time, and a field that has a wide range of skill between mediocre and expert practitioners. One thing i see today is terrible craftsmanship due to newbies dominating.
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Edward de Jong Nov 21
Replying to @antoniogm
SpaceX is doing a great job, but really chemical rockets for launch are stupid as heck. They should be using electromagnetic railgun type of tech to launch, would save so much fuel, and be less dangerous. Most of the fuel is spent just getting the rocket going at the start.
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Edward de Jong Nov 21
Replying to @3gregor3 @Google
Google has a very poor design aesthetic. Recently redesigned their icons so that they look so similar you can't tell them apart. And their obsession with flat graphics is like some kind of wish for an earlier 256 color palette universe that we escaped from. They need spanking!
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Edward de Jong Nov 21
Replying to @hillelogram
Most programmers will eventually have to ask a user to enter their name address and other identifying information plus a few more pieces of data, validate it, Then store it somewhere so It can be retrieved
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Edward de Jong Nov 20
Replying to @yoruba_dev
Press INSTANT STOP, RESET, LOCK then type in a 12 digit number, press RELEASE, and then START, and watch the 200 instructions per second blink by with lights showing everything. No invisible state on this machine! Still too fast to follow in real time. IBM 1620
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Edward de Jong Nov 20
Replying to @Love2Code
There was nothing reduced about RISC machines, it was hell to write in Assembler. Every CPU today is a very complex beast, with billions of transistors. Almost impossible to know what costs time on a chip now with all the microinstructions and shuffling going on underneath.
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Edward de Jong Nov 20
Replying to @Love2Code
That medium article is full of factual inaccuracies. Nobody uses Thumb on ARM any more; it was for tiny RAM environments like Nintendo Game Boy which gave ARM its first design win. And PowerPC was never a reduced instruction set; it had a ridiculous number of branch instructions.
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Edward de Jong Nov 19
absolute garbage advice in this article. "Check your open source products for patches". If we did that, we would break our service every day, as many large open source products such as Asterisk have constant patching, and some are reversed later. You can't blindly update. Danger!
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Edward de Jong Nov 19
Replying to @patrickc
Firstly most emails are spam. Make stronger laws against spam, and we cut out most emails. Secondly, if you are talking about wasting energy, the "proof of work" busywork baked into how BitCoin works, is the dumbest waste of energy in the history of the planet, more than ireland
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Edward de Jong Nov 19
Replying to @geogebra @jcponcemath
It would be nice if they credited Charles and Ray Eames' powers of 10 movie that was made so many decades ago, which they stole frames from.
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Edward de Jong Nov 18
Replying to @pavel_bazant @1amjau
Mac OSX is a RTOS; it has many kernel modifications so that their Music software can run with guaranteed low latency. It just isn't a full general purpose RTOS like it would be in a missile system. But the Audio Units are extremely performant.
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Edward de Jong Nov 18
Replying to @DrEricDing
Well, since 80% of patients with coronavirus show no symptoms, the 95% is not nearly as exciting. What was the success rate of the placebo? These small early tests need to be followed up by more rigorous tests. Obviously they want to get people all jazzed about the future.
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