Twitter | Search | |
Church Monuments
The Church Monuments Society offers a focus for those with an interest in church monuments of all types and periods. Tweets by
23,812
Tweets
1,110
Following
4,859
Followers
Tweets
Church Monuments retweeted
Find a Grave Jan 23
The marker for Hall of Fame MLB player Ernie "Mr. Cub" Banks is a loving tribute to his career & achievements. A mitt tops the plinth, while two bats flank his number, 14. Banks himself is carved in relief on the front of the stone, ready to play. pc: Dale
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
Canadian Cemetery History Jan 23
Came across this stone, this scene, last year while walking through a snowy cemetery: "[This] lovely bud To us awhile was given Transplanted now [It] brightly blooms in heaven." The relentless passage of time is often shown in a poignantly poetic manner in old cemeteries.
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
Adventures in Cemetery Hopping Jan 24
More Charleston, S.C. Cemetery Hopping: Exploring St. Philip’s Churchyard and Cemetery, Part I
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
New Hampshire Cemeteries Jan 24
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
Pittsburgh Cemeteries Jan 24
(1) Samuel Kissick Carnahan, Son of J. & E.J. Carnahan, d. 1 Sept 1864. Aged 23 Yrs. 11 Mo." He mustered in w/ 62nd PA Infantry, Co. A, on July 22, 1861 in . Transferred to 155th PA Inf, Co. F, on Nov. 26, 1861. He was wounded at Fredericksburg.
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
Friends of Flaybrick Jan 24
The largest family memorial in Flaybrick is that of Sir William Jackson, 1st Baronet, 1805-1876 and his family. An English industrialist and Chair of Birkenhead's Improvement Committee. One of Bhead's founders, involved in creating Bhead Park and the Chester & Bhead Railway.
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
𝕮𝖊𝖒𝖊𝖙𝖊𝖗𝖞 𝕮𝖑𝖚𝖇 22h
The one where me and paid a visit to Buitenveldert begraafplaats and found musicians, writers and architects! 🇳🇱
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
Conor Dodd Jan 24
An example of one of the more unusual inscriptions on an early headstone in Glasnevin. On the grave of Thomas Prendergast from Ballindine in Mayo who, according to it, "fell an early victim to the arduous pursuits of Medical Science" on the 1st of December 1834, aged 20.
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
John Salmon 21h
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
A Grave Announcement Jan 24
ROAD TO ETERNITY: In the stultifying mist, a street of crosses guides the passerby towards the dying light. The haze coats the stones like spluttering snow, as the mourning winds cry out in the tree tops, barely visible through the gloom. Photo: St. Thomas’ Church, Mellor.
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
ReptonGuide Jan 23
London is a city of soot cicatrix. Even in its great necropolises - Hightgate, Kemsal Green, Noxwood - the stone guardians of the dead bear its dark scars. - Elizabeth Havant, 1897
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
𝔅𝔢𝔱𝔱𝔢𝔯 𝔗𝔬𝔪𝔟𝔰 𝔞𝔫𝔡 𝔊𝔞𝔯𝔡𝔢𝔫𝔰 Jan 23
the “new” face of the restored Ghent Altarpiece lamb has got the interwebs in a tizzy so, in its honour, here’s a rather jaunty petit mouton I photographed in a Winnipeg cemetery many many years ago.
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
WillowGrove 6h
Two books (the old and new testaments?) on top of this memorial to the Whittaker family
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
Scottish Graveyards 3h
"I'll ne'er blame my partial fancy, Naething could resist my Nancy: But to see her was to love her; Love but her, and love for ever." Lines from 's "Ae Fond Kiss" written about Nancy Maclehose. This is her grave marker in Edinburgh's Canongate Kirkyard (1/3)
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
Cat Irving 15h
Michaelskapelle Ossuary in Oppenheim, Germany, holding around 20,000 individuals. Anatomists - note the persistent metopic suture in the centre of the upper row!
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
Sally Badham Jan 24
Replying to @SallyBadham
Whoops wrong effigy. This is the heart monument to John de Sturmey d. pre 1302. Effigy in Posy's image probably commemorates his son who held until 1324 or later.
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
⚫ Dr Helen Wilson 7h
Day 5 of 7 in (a picture a day for a week, no people, no explanations). You nominate someone different every day. I was nominated by and today I'm nominating (if you so wish)
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
Sally Badham Jan 24
Church leaflets always a good place to start but, as in this case, do not always reflect up-to-date specialist research. For military effigies county guides much better - I use them all the time.
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
Posy Hill Jan 24
Replying to @SallyBadham
The biggest and smallest knight effigies in one church. Details of chain mail still visible on the little chap with the heart, although his lion’s seen better days. Ch.lft. Says he’s C12 and big knight “plate armour of C13” 🤔
Reply Retweet Like
Church Monuments retweeted
Sally Badham Jan 24
Miniature effigy with knight holding a heart casket, resting on a later tomb. Armour indicates dates to the late-13th century and may have marked the heart burial of John de Sturmy, who held the manor of Sturmy Sutton and died pre 1302.
Reply Retweet Like