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Chris Masterjohn
PhD in Nutritional Sciences. I use out-of-the-box thinking and scientific expertise to turn complex science into practical ideas you can use for your health.
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Chris Masterjohn May 17
Replying to @stacyackerson
And thank you for drawing my attention to it.
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Chris Masterjohn May 17
Replying to @stacyackerson
I just made it so it only appears on desktop, where it is easy to close and only takes up a small amount of room in the lower left corner. Sorry about that.
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Chris Masterjohn May 17
Replying to @Grasshopper
You put them there to make it hard to cancel.
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Chris Masterjohn May 17
Transferring your phone number has nothing to do with cancelation. That's what you should do if you want to keep the phone number.
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Chris Masterjohn May 17
That's utter bullshit. You should never need to call anyone to cancel anything. That's absolutely ridiculous. And the PINS and address and codes and shit? Absolutely insane.
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Chris Masterjohn May 17
You should be able to cancel anything with a click. Putting you through those hoops to make it hard to cancel is evil.
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Chris Masterjohn May 17
Then they need an article on why regulations forced them to do this. It smells to me like a piece of shit company that wants to make it hard to cancel.
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Chris Masterjohn May 17
Replying to @stacyackerson
What popup and how did it stop you? Was it a little alert in the corner or was it a big thing that took over the page?
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Chris Masterjohn May 17
Want an evil company you should never patronize? Why? Look at their article on how to cancel your account: Absolute unmitigated evil. Don't ever sign up.
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Chris Masterjohn retweeted
Stephan Guyenet, PhD May 16
Here are the changes in body fat mass over two weeks from recent trial of unprocessed vs. ultra-processed diets. Participants were simply eating to satisfaction with no awareness of calorie intake. Choose your path wisely.
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Chris Masterjohn May 16
So I think what we will see in the coming years is we're going to see supplements of niacin particularly in the form of nicotinamide riboside measured against health endpoints.
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Chris Masterjohn May 16
Studies suggest that niacin supplementation can raise that to 6.0, which is very high compared to the average "apparently healthy" person out there.
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Chris Masterjohn May 16
I don’t love this company, but, sometimes they’re the only one in town that does something, and here it is: HDRI’s NADH/NADPH.
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Chris Masterjohn May 16
What’s the best blood test for niacin? 🤷
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Chris Masterjohn May 16
I think in particular the best thing to do overall is to measure erythrocyte NAD and NADPH.
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Chris Masterjohn May 16
In hyperammonemia you will pee out some amino acids especially glutamine.
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Chris Masterjohn May 16
What I do think is good is either the erythrocyte level of NAD or the whole blood level of NAD, which is going to be mostly in erythrocytes.
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Chris Masterjohn May 16
I strongly recommend against using simply blood levels of niacin or niacin metabolites. LabCorp and Quest offer tests like this, and I do not think those are good for looking at anything other than recent intake of niacin.
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Chris Masterjohn May 16
Any of these things could cause you to run low in niacin even though you seem to be doing everything right from the point of view of diet.
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Chris Masterjohn May 16
NEW Chris Masterjohn Lite! #138: The Best Blood Test for Niacin
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