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Channel 4 1h
Replying to @Channel4
We also want to take this chance to thank all the staff dedicated to their work within the system and for their endless passion and commitment to our communities. Please keep sharing your thoughts and ideas using
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Channel 4 1h
Replying to @jones_martinw
Thank you to everyone this evening for your contributions; we’ve sadly run out of time. We want to thank for joining us and sharing his considerable experience in regards to such a complicated topic.
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Channel 4 1h
Replying to @Channel4
Spice use is a problem and a real obstacle to rehabilitation. The system needs to find a way of encouraging people to find some direction and hope in order that the board can see a credible way to manage them back into the community. -Martin
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Channel 4 1h
Replying to @Channel4
There are no easy answers to this question - resources are an issue. Further episodes in this series will illustrate the serious challenges faced by prison officers and create an opportunity for further debate and discussion. -Martin
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Channel 4 1h
Replying to @Channel4
Funding decisions are a matter for the government. But clearly more needs to be done to turn people's lives around in prison. Some good work is happening via new progression regimes to try to provide more hope for people stuck in the system. -Martin
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Channel 4 1h
Replying to @Channel4
If a prisoner's behaviour is still chaotic it is difficult to see how that risk can be managed in the community. -Martin
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Channel 4 1h
Replying to @Channel4
The issue we have is determining whether an individual still represents a risk to the public. A panel is not there to punish the prisoner we are looking at the protection of the public. -Martin
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Channel 4 1h
Replying to @Channel4
Many IPPs suffer from mental health difficulties. This is often exacerbated by the lack of certainty. In many cases mental heath support in the community is key to managing release. -Martin
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Channel 4 2h
Replying to @Channel4
However,if all sentences were simply converted how do you deal with people that have committed extremely serious offences and might have otherwise received a life sentence? -Martin
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Channel 4 2h
Replying to @jones_martinw
The Parole Board must be satisfied that prison is no longer needed for the protection of the public. It might be possible to review the sentences by changing the law but this might be complex and difficult to achieve. -Martin
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Channel 4 2h
Replying to @jones_martinw
A parole panel will look at all the evidence to decide whether the individual is still a risk. It is a decision based on an objective assessment of evidence not emotion. -Martin
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Channel 4 2h
Replying to @jones_martinw
The legal position is that IPPs will not be released until the Parole Board decide they are safe to be released. - Martin
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Channel 4 2h
Replying to @jones_martinw
The sentence was abolished in 2012 because of concerns about the problems it was creating in the system and the lack of certainty -Martin
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Channel 4 2h
Replying to @jones_martinw
will be looking at the system from all angles and will include an insight from the criminal bar- Martin
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Channel 4 2h
Replying to @jones_martinw
Let’s talk about where the UK criminal justice system goes from here. We have Chief Exec of the Parole Board here to answer your questions and thoughts. Tweet us using
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Channel 4 2h
Replying to @Channel4
Please note: We will not discuss any individual case specifics
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Channel 4 2h
Disclaimer: The following tweets represent the personal views of and do not represent the opinions of Channel 4 or of his employer.
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Channel 4 2h
How can a system that was abolished in 2012 still house around 2,400 prisoners in indeterminate sentences? Join in the conversation with your ideas, thoughts and questions to Chief Executive of the parole board using
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Channel 4 3h
Straight after Crime and Punishment, join Chief Exec of the Parole Board to pose ideas, observations and even questions on where we go from here for the British criminal justice system. Tweet using
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Channel 4 4h
. has been the Chief Executive of the Parole Board since 2015 and has over twenty years working in a number of agencies within the criminal justice system. Join him tonight from 10pm as we ask Twitter: Where next for the British justice system?
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