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Adrian Bott
Here are several reasons why I think it's important to counter the 'Easter was pagan' rubbish with properly sourced & attributed facts. 1. Bogus history obscures real history, and the real history is not just rich and interesting, it tells us who we are and how we got here.
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Adrian Bott 27 Mar 18
Replying to @Cavalorn
2. The 'pagan Easter' tropes diminish, deny or outright ignore the influence of Passover on Easter, and that's been held up as anti-Semitic.
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Adrian Bott 27 Mar 18
Replying to @Cavalorn
3. Much of the misunderstanding of Easter's actual lore and history comes from assuming the English name for the festival - Easter - defines the whole event. That's an absurd degree of Anglocentrism.
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Adrian Bott 27 Mar 18
Replying to @Cavalorn
4. The bogus Ishtar/Easter connection was originally made in the context of an anti-Catholic rant (The Two Babylons). So there's anti-Catholicism baked into the whole 'Easter was pagan' argument too.
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Adrian Bott 27 Mar 18
Replying to @Cavalorn
5. Claiming Easter is all about indigenous Anglo-Saxon (thus Germanic) deities is characteristic of certain strains of hard right-wing thought.
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Adrian Bott 27 Mar 18
Replying to @Cavalorn
6. The myth of pagan Easter is used in some fundamentalist Christian circles to discourage believers from celebrating it.
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Adrian Bott 27 Mar 18
Replying to @Cavalorn
7. The insistence that 'the Church hijacked pagan festivals to make it easier to convert and oppress the population' paints a ludicrously unbalanced and ill-informed picture of how the early Church worked.
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Adrian Bott 27 Mar 18
Replying to @Cavalorn
8. Facts good. Bullshit bad.
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Adrian Bott 27 Mar 18
Replying to @Cavalorn
The 'Easter was pagan' myth manages to be anti-Semitic, anti-Catholic, anti-Christian and anti-pagan (because it peddles a false version of pagan belief) which is quite an achievement, really.
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Adrian Bott 27 Mar 18
Replying to @Cavalorn
So that's my justification for boring you all rigid at this time of year. I won't think ill of you if you want to mute, block or unfollow; I know it can get a bit one-note. Normal service will be resumed in a few days. :)
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Adrian Bott 27 Mar 18
Replying to @Cavalorn
Thread continues here...
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Natural Philosopher 27 Mar 18
Replying to @Cavalorn @Metakosmia
It sounds rather like Easter was pagan and Pascha was Christian, then (somewhere in England) the two festivals merged into one. So where did the Easter bunny come in?
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Adrian Bott 27 Mar 18
Replying to @ATBollands @Metakosmia
They didn't so much merge into one as the name of one got attached to the other. The Easter Bunny was (as has already been noted) originally the Easter Hare - see De Ovis Paschalibus, Von Franckenau
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Adrian Bott 27 Mar 18
Replying to @ATBollands @Metakosmia
The Easter Hare is first recorded very late, though (1682 CE) and only as the creature that people jokingly say brings the decorated Easter eggs. There's zero evidence that it was part of any pagan tradition.
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Adrian Bott 28 Mar 18
Replying to @JasonBehan3
[[[citation needed]]]
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Historybuff1066 27 Mar 18
Replying to @Cavalorn
A voice of reason in the darkness of lunacy. Is this thread available on Facebook because I have spent 4 days trying to reason with Neo-Pagans.
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Katy Extinction, PhD 27 Mar 18
Replying to @Cavalorn
Hey I remember you from LiveJournal! Thank you for still doing this.
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Mark_Alden 27 Mar 18
Replying to @Cavalorn
Define "the real history".
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Cory Moesta 27 Mar 18
Replying to @Mark_Alden @Cavalorn
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