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Canada's History
Our mission is to make the discovery of our nation's past relevant, engaging, empowering and accessible. Subscribe:
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Canada's History 19h
Hurray for the May long weekend! But do you know why we have Victoria Day?
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Canada's History May 17
On May 17, 1642, a small group of French settlers landed on the banks of what would become . In this video, Hendrik van Gijseghem, from , discusses the amazing discoveries made during the archaeological excavations at this site.
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Canada's History May 17
In The Prairie Populist, University of Regina professor J.F. Conway provides a glimpse of a man who has disappeared from the historical narrative.
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Canada's History May 17
From wolf attacks to brute labour, from cholera to forest fires, from black flies to hatchet wounds, northern humour is birthed out of everyday misery.
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Canada's History May 17
Did you know that the creator of "For Better or For Worse," is Lynn Johnston, a Canadian cartoonist from Collingwood, Ontario?
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Canada's History May 16
Dying for a Drink is a brisk read that aptly describes Canada’s temperance movement and the move towards .
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Canada's History May 16
Whether you're tying the knot...or not, this Beaver Bow Tie would be a fabulous addition to any outfit. Add it to your shopping cart from our online store
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Canada's History May 16
Have you ever noticed that many engineers wear a ring on their pinky finger? Learn more about how this is a symbol of the engineering code-of-ethics and which historic event these rings are said to be from.
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Canada's History May 16
We’re looking at stories of workers in the April issue of Kayak to mark the biggest protest ever against unfair work in Canada, which took place 100 years ago this spring: the .
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Canada's History May 15
In her engaging book One Hundred Years of Struggle, Joan Sangster presents a complex and nuanced view of the efforts made by Canadian women to fully participate in democracy.
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Canada's History May 15
In this , which can be adapted for multiple ages and grades, students analyze multiple accounts of the , noting the similarities and differences between the sources.
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Canada's History May 15
Who was that impassioned woman at the heart of the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike? And why did her memory become lost to time? #1919
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Canada's History May 15
The Historical Thinking Summer Institute is a transformative professional learning opportunity for K-12 , , , & . Register before June 1st to guarantee your spot!
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Canada's History May 15
When you visit a this spring, ask yourself, “Who built this historic site?”
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Canada's History May 15
that Vancouver built and opened Stanley Park while Chinese and Indigenous people were living in the area? By the 1950s, and with a trip to the Supreme Court of Canada, Vancouver had emptied Stanley Park of inhabitants.
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Canada's History May 14
Getting started in family history can be overwhelming. Find out where to begin with the help of Paul Jones in his latest Roots column.
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Canada's History May 14
Calling all ! From the coal mines in to the cotton mills in , embark on a tour of Canada from the comfort of your home with this selection of books.
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Canada's History May 14
Across Canada many fine old buildings vanished under the wheels of "progress." Many in Montreal mourned the loss of Prince of Wales Terrace, a Georgian row built by Sir George Simpson of the Hudson's Bay Company.
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Canada's History May 14
From lumber mill fires, to asbestos exposure, to coal mining disasters and subsequent strikes, the B.C. persistently pushed for health and safety regulations to protect workers facing dangerous .
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Canada's History May 13
“Boys performed a variety of tasks at the Victorian and constituted an important part of its labour force. In Nova Scotia, for instance, of a total mine workforce of five thousand in 1890, over eleven hundred were under 18 years of age.”
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