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Canadian Cemetery History
Cemeteries are important historical sites. Daily photos of Canadian cemeteries, gravestones, grave symbols, and grave verses.
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Canadian Cemetery History retweeted
Canadian Cemetery History 4h
Sometimes the beauty is in the simplicity. Poor Evelyn Nash left her parents at just 26 after dying of pulmonary tuberculosis. Her simple but touching epitaph reads "Only good night beloved, not farewell." RIP, Evelyn.
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Canadian Cemetery History 2h
It's beautiful but strange. It has an almost cartoony look to my modern eyes.
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Canadian Cemetery History 2h
Replying to @nader_habash
Incredible
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Canadian Cemetery History 3h
Replying to @SalzerInes
Beautiful stone and inscription.
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Canadian Cemetery History 3h
Looks like a soul effigy to me, but or others who have studied these in detail would probably be better equipped to answer.
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Canadian Cemetery History 4h
Replying to @JAH5198
Stoney Creek Cemetery
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Canadian Cemetery History 4h
Sometimes the beauty is in the simplicity. Poor Evelyn Nash left her parents at just 26 after dying of pulmonary tuberculosis. Her simple but touching epitaph reads "Only good night beloved, not farewell." RIP, Evelyn.
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Canadian Cemetery History retweeted
Canadian Cemetery History 23h
A great new account just started using the handle , about New Hampshire Cemeteries. Can't wait to see what they bring us. Give them a follow! 👍
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Canadian Cemetery History 18h
Replying to @boyceonteck
Awesome.
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Canadian Cemetery History 23h
A great new account just started using the handle , about New Hampshire Cemeteries. Can't wait to see what they bring us. Give them a follow! 👍
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Canadian Cemetery History retweeted
Canadian Cemetery History May 25
(1/3) How strange but neat to see a plaque from the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution in a Canadian cemetery. This gravestone (and plaque) are for William Gage, born 1744, died 1820. Gage was born in Ireland, emigrated to New York, and fought against...
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Canadian Cemetery History May 25
Replying to @Cerydwyn13
Thanks!
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Canadian Cemetery History May 25
Replying to @Cerydwyn13
My pleasure, I hope they find it as fascinating as I did! I knew Gage was there, but had no idea about the plaque. As an aside, I'd love to know what the definitive birth year is, the sources all seem to conflict on it.
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Canadian Cemetery History May 25
Replying to @Cerydwyn13
It's the first and only time I've seen a DAR plaque in Canada. Here's the story behind it:
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Canadian Cemetery History retweeted
Cynthia Boatright Raleigh May 25
Replying to @CaCemeteryHist
I didn't know DAR placed markers in Canada (I'm a DAR member). I looked up Wm Gage in the DAR database; he is designated as an American Patriot (# A132621). To qualify, one must have rendered service during the Revolutionary War....
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Canadian Cemetery History May 25
This stone is for a husband, wife, and son. Here I've seen this symbol numerous times even on children's gravestones, which is why I usually assume it's not a Masonic indication unless there are other signs.
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Canadian Cemetery History May 25
Replying to @CaCemeteryHist
(3/3) that sit on lands once farmed by the family. Gage's gravestone is likely the oldest extant stone in Stoney Creek Cemetery, a site which sits across from Battlefield House, a popular tourist attraction for War of 1812 history. Much interesting and turbulent history here.
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Canadian Cemetery History May 25
Replying to @CaCemeteryHist
(2/3) the British in the American Revolution, but afterwards settled in what is now Hamilton, Ontario. Gage family lands were the site of the Battle of Stoney Creek in 1813, and they helped care for wounded soldiers. Now Gage Park and Gage Avenue are named after places...
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Canadian Cemetery History May 25
(1/3) How strange but neat to see a plaque from the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution in a Canadian cemetery. This gravestone (and plaque) are for William Gage, born 1744, died 1820. Gage was born in Ireland, emigrated to New York, and fought against...
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Canadian Cemetery History May 24
Replying to @TheTaoOfOat @BeachKnot
Less common in my experience as a way to express Masonic membership (far more common to see the square and compass), especially on a family stone. But it's certainly a possibility. The mystery is the fun. 😉
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