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CSRD @ Arizona State
The Center for the Study of Race & Democracy is a leading problem-solving venture committed to engaged scholarship & informed dialogue around race and democracy
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CSRD @ Arizona State retweeted
Kenneth L. Shropshire Sep 12
Make plans to join us.
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CSRD @ Arizona State Sep 18
Ten years after the election of Barack Obama, America still is walking the line between hope and hate. Join us for our Rising Voices Lecture this Friday as we explore the past, present and future! Link to register in bio.
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CSRD @ Arizona State Sep 17
"Here is a story about profiteering and neglect in American healthcare, reported in devastating detail by the Des Moines Register." | reports:
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CSRD @ Arizona State Sep 14
Thanks to all the students who came out tonight. We have lots of other events you can check out at (and we could always use more social media volunteers)
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CSRD @ Arizona State Sep 14
Thanks for following. We will see you next week. Check out our events at
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CSRD @ Arizona State Sep 14
“Is my culture dying because it’s being spread out so thin, or is it being elevated?” From the audience. Our audience never lets our panelists sleep.
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CSRD @ Arizona State Sep 14
“There is a lot of possibility and beauty in migration and moving around. Dr. Huizar-Hernandez
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CSRD @ Arizona State Sep 14
“Disney commercializes everything and takes out the tradition. Then again...the film prompted my family to research more information. It’s much more interesting than how it’s portrayed in the film.”
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CSRD @ Arizona State Sep 14
“Disney is not in the business of not being problematic, they are in the business of entertainment. We should critique, and we should recognize the value of putting black and brown people on the screen.”
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CSRD @ Arizona State retweeted
Megan U. Boyanton Sep 14
“One of the things I love about this film is that it shows different aspects of Mexico,” - Panelist Mathew Sandoval, PhD, talking about Mayan and Aztec representation in the film, “Coco,” through
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CSRD @ Arizona State Sep 14
“The danger of moving past a term like people of color is we get into thinking we’re postracial. We thought we had that with Batak Obama’s and...we didn’t.” Dr. Huizar-Hernandez
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CSRD @ Arizona State Sep 14
“We are looking at a very regional and racial version of Mexico in this film. We don’t see much of the indigenous parts of Mexico.” Dr. Sandoval
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CSRD @ Arizona State Sep 14
“Where are the people who mentored the creatives who went to Mexico? Disney could have given credit to many, many people and they didn’t.”
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CSRD @ Arizona State Sep 14
“Can we be represented as something other than the poorest?” “Well, they do own a business. They aren’t the poorest. If we want to see the richest, we can see a novella.” Back and forth on the panel.
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CSRD @ Arizona State Sep 14
“There are some stereotypes a chanclas...but we use those, too.”
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CSRD @ Arizona State Sep 14
“We are hoping this is the beginning of a more diverse representation of Latino communities. When we tell different stories, we think of the world on different ways.” Dr. Huizar-Hernandez
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CSRD @ Arizona State Sep 14
“The beating heart of this film is about keeping families together.” Dr. Sandoval
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CSRD @ Arizona State Sep 14
“This movie made a lot of things mainstream, like mariachis and the border.”
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CSRD @ Arizona State Sep 14
“What people can recognize is the quotidian aspects of the border, and the real emotional hurt of the way the border divides family.” -Dr. Huizar-Hernandez
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CSRD @ Arizona State Sep 14
“Part of the assimilation process is losing your ancestral culture. This film could open that up that conversation in my family.” Dr. Sandoval
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