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Bryan A. Garner
Editor in chief, Black's Law Dictionary; author, Garner's Modern English Usage. Fall in love with language & it will love you back.
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Bryan A. Garner retweeted
Chief Justice Beth Walker 6h
Day 4. Chief Justice tagged me to post covers of 7 books I love over 7 days. No explanations, just covers. With each post, I tag someone else. 1 cover/day for a week. Today, I nominate .
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Bryan A. Garner 12h
The presumption in American English is that prefixed terms are solid. Hence “nonfiction,” not “non-fiction.” ⁦
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Bryan A. Garner Jan 21
How’s your conscience? Astonishingly, there are nearly 200 reported appellate opinions referring to the “shock the conscious” standard. Have those writers no compunction?
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Bryan A. Garner Jan 19
"And once men started wearing perukes in the 18th century, the pursing of lips became unpopular." via
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Bryan A. Garner Jan 18
Happy National Thesaurus Day. How many thesauri/thesauruses do you own?
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Bryan A. Garner Jan 18
Replying to @leoschneider2
How would you define it?
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Bryan A. Garner Jan 18
Word of the day: RATAPLAN = the repeated sound of beating, as with drums <the rataplan of denials of fault with the the shutdown>. It's onomatopoeic. Runners-up: GAFFER (= an old man) & GAMMER (= an old woman); etymologically, they're altered forms of "godfather" and "godmother."
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Bryan A. Garner retweeted
Barry McCarty Jan 18
Celebrating (the birthday of Peter Mark Roget, January 18, 1779) with this 1951 work from that is excellent in discriminating between synonyms.
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Bryan A. Garner retweeted
Jeremy Waldron Jan 16
Students of Congress please, please watch current confidence debate in UK House of Commons. Speeches spoken, not read. Interjections enlivening debate. Those speaking often “giving way” to challenges & questions. Not deadening atmosphere of predigested speeches written by aides.
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Bryan A. Garner Jan 16
“Convince yourself that you are working in clay not marble, on paper not eternal bronze: let that first sentence be as stupid as it wishes.…Your whole first paragraph or first page may have to be guillotined in any case after your piece is finished.” —Jacques Barzun
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Bryan A. Garner Jan 15
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Bryan A. Garner Jan 14
“It is a surprising fact that a child, during the first five years of his life, is able to learn a language — a foreign language; for to the new-born babe all languages are foreign.” —Philip Boswood Ballard
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Bryan A. Garner Jan 11
“True brevity of expression consists in everywhere saying only what is worth saying, and in avoiding tedious detail about things that everyone can supply for himself. This involves correct discrimination between what is necessary and what is superfluous.” —Arthur Schopenhauer
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Bryan A. Garner retweeted
Barry McCarty Jan 9
Merely disagreeing with someone’s opinion is not the same as “fact-checking” it.
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Bryan A. Garner Jan 10
In Austin today, I’ll be teaching the third book from the bottom at a start-up company that’s going gangbusters. Thanks to ⁦⁩ for being such a great publisher. HBR racks are in almost every airport bookstore you’ll visit.
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Bryan A. Garner Jan 9
Replying to @meganpaolone
Get the phone app! That’s the best. No web-based version. Cheers.
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Bryan A. Garner retweeted
Barry McCarty Jan 9
Thank you, , for a fascinating afternoon of conversation on rhetoric, lexicography, and history, in the perfect setting for such: your magnificent library. I’m grateful for your friendship and our time together.
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Bryan A. Garner Jan 9
What a delight to have ⁦⁩ visit yesterday. But drat, no joint photos to show for it! He’s a fellow bibliomaniac.
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Bryan A. Garner Jan 9
Word of the day: RED HERRING. Or maybe catch of the day. I’m running a special on red herrings.
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Bryan A. Garner Jan 8
“However frenzied or disarrayed or complicated your thoughts might be, punctuation tempers them and sends signals to your reader about how to take them in. We rarely give these symbols a second glance….Their presence is more felt than seen.” —Karen Elizabeth Gordon
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