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Martin
Botanical surveyor and artist. If it's about plants, I'll be interested.
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Martin retweeted
Hartlepool Council Jul 15
Two oak trees in Church Square are being chemically treated and removed following the discovery of Oak Processionary Moth caterpillars.
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Martin 1m
Probably one of the David Austin English roses and may be Lady Emma Hamilton which has a strong scent. Another similar is Summer Song
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Martin 2m
Replying to @ThirlwallAssoc
Probably Convolvulus cneorum (has white flowers) It's quite a popular plant for that sort of hot dry situation/pots. There are lots of cultivars of dwarf Salvias and also of the Sedum so can't really help there sorry
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Martin Jul 15
Pink's a rare genetic variation; the white I saw had many other white plants nearby in the lawn but only in immediate area. Conservationists are tasked with conserving all genetic variation within a species & flower colour is easy for public to see variation, hence pink hunt!
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Martin Jul 14
Oh, I know what you mean (especially when you want to see a plant) and it was the right habitat for hare's-foot-clover to grow in, but it is red clover ...just growing a bit on the small side
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Martin Jul 14
Replying to @Bex_Cartwright
I think this might be the rayed form of Common Knapweed which has the outer row of 'petals' to make the flower look very like Greater Knapweed. It might be worth checking the leaves and the bracts under the flower if you visit again It's a very beautiful white form 😍
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Martin Jul 14
that looks like spear thistle to me....marsh has much smaller flowers and is usually a tall narrow plant
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Martin Jul 14
Replying to @wonky_eggs
πŸ˜‚
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Martin Jul 14
I know what you mean about taking on more. A way of explaining it might be to suggest thinking of the harebell areas in the same way people do for planted daffodils. Mow until they start to shoot to flower, leave to flower & then set seed, then cut and mow area as normal.
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Martin Jul 14
Replying to @dave_renwick
yes I think so...you are doing well this week! Train tracks and sidings usually have interesting wildflowers
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Martin Jul 14
Replying to @wonky_eggs
eeeek! I've been found out πŸ€₯ Yes I did use my spare huge inflatable hand that I carry everywhere for lols and now I really think I should because the thought of it has made me laugh πŸ˜†
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Martin Jul 14
Not terrible because 'you' cleverly focused on the important bit (the leaves) to make it easier to ID it as Fen Bedstraw.
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Martin Jul 14
Replying to @heather_c_c
Yes but old garden escapees - they are Dianthus plumarius and the site at Fountains Abbey is well known - more info and distribution and they are also very beautiful and delicate - what a great plant to spot!
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Martin Jul 14
Replying to @stuzzicadenti12
Scentless Mayweed it is then. I agree, they do look very similar and that's why I mentioned the habitat as sometimes that can help give extra evidence to indicate for which plant it is for similar looking species.
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Martin retweeted
Graham Megson Jul 14
Seaside centaury on Holy Island
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Martin Jul 14
Harebell is later flowering and so you may be able to mow their areas regularly/normally early in the year (which may prevent the false oat-grass/other grasses flowering) and then stop mowing for the harebell to flower and seed...then mow normally again.
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Martin retweeted
Barry πŸ‡ͺπŸ‡Ί Jul 14
Marsh ragwort (L) and common ragwort (R)
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Martin Jul 14
Replying to @anneontheshelf
Yes agreed - I had to remind myself of that again last week before doing a guided walk
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Martin Jul 14
Replying to @anneontheshelf
that is a very striking photo of the great willowherb
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Martin Jul 14
If it helps...up in the Tees Valley this isn't native to our area and I only see it if someone has sown wildflower seeds from a seed packet. (that probably doesn't help sorry). I agree...just when you think you've understood a species...there's always something else to know...
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