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Martin
currently writing 'Finding Ancient Grassland' Botanical surveyor and artist. If it's about plants, I'll be interested.
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Martin Jul 21
that looks like Red Bartsia (Odontites vernus) to me
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Martin Jul 21
Replying to @WasNothingReal
that looks like marsh woundwort to me - looking very elegant there too
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Martin Jul 21
Difficult to work out the point of it in relation to UK. Might be of interest to trial in schools where land is at a premium. Article elsewhere mentions using "a microbial wash is brewed from forest soil... " which is interesting & ahead of UK conservation techniques
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Martin Jul 21
it's a lovely annual - caused quite the sensation back in the 80s* or 90s when it was on the front of one of the seed catalogues
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Martin Jul 20
Hmmm - probably - there should be 4 (or 5) stamens and it would have been rooting at the nodes of the low stems. I've just been having a look at the Sagina options and there's a lot, but I think S. procumbens is the most likely.
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Martin Jul 20
If it helps - there is a photo on this page which shows the two stamens sticking out (forked stigma in middle) and then on this page there are 4 (red) sticking out past the petals (plus 1 white stigma)
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Martin Jul 20
Is this the stamens Moira? Stace 4 says two stamens sticking out for E. plantagineum and (usually) 4-5 for E. vulgare Tricky to tell from the photo for me and I'd like to see a more flowers than just the one, but yes, a possibility
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Martin Jul 20
Yes it's all LWS for coastal grassland along there (and while I remember Coatham Green is a SSSI now so any re-introductions of purple milk vetch will need permission, I think)
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Martin Jul 20
I think Joshua is best placed to give you the talk you are looking for because he can do pollinator side of things - I focus only on the plants to make an interesting garden because I assume if there are lots of different plants in the garden then the rest just turns up.
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Martin Jul 20
yes agreed!
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Martin Jul 20
Replying to @swansoam
hello - this is just part and parcel of the normal genetic variation within Rosebay Willowherb - there is a garden cultivar which is a similar colour
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Martin Jul 20
One of our members, Pamela Taylor, has an exhibition starting today at the Old Court in Winsor, UK - do visit safely if you are in the area. Or see Pamela's website
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Martin Jul 19
there isn't a 'wild' one as such, usually just a seed of one usually grown in the garden that happens to have germinated in the wild. There are 3 different species of larkspur recorded in the UK; some information about the most commonly found one is here
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Martin Jul 19
hello, I don't have anything particularly focused on pollinators though I can talk about the wildflowers in the garden. You might also try the new RHS garden at Bridgewater as RHS have pollinator/plants/garden info.
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Martin Jul 19
I thought this was funny Moira, although I can't see the Sandwich?
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Martin Jul 19
It looks like an annual Larkspur to me too, perhaps Consolida regalis (Forking Larkspur)? It's odd how plants like these turn up in the wild, sometimes it is obvious i.e. near a garden, sometimes it can just be a person scattering a seed packet, sometimes birds 🤷
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Martin Jul 15
okay - I'll start then - second of the photos just reminded me of Hemlock water-dropwort so I'll suggest that.
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Martin Jul 15
Mystery solved 😁 thank you for that!
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Martin Jul 15
the bewildering wonders of twitter - well you certainly deserve to put your feet up!
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Martin Jul 15
why are you answering a tweet from last year Louise? is this another 'thyme' incident (that no-one actually saw earlier - honest!) 😁
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