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Dr Amy Kavanagh
Visually impaired activist & campaigner, WI member, doggo fan & PhD on British India She/her
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Dr Amy Kavanagh 3h
Replying to @dan0mah
Well the sound quality isn’t great from my body cam! Also it’s more accessible if they have subtitles. Just windows movie maker! Very low tech.
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Dr Amy Kavanagh 3h
Replying to @dan0mah
Oh thank you Dan! I really appreciate you saying that. It takes time to edit them in my slightly rubbish way but I do hope they show people that many of the challenges are around behaviours or really unnecessary issues that can be so easily fixed!
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Dr Amy Kavanagh 3h
Replying to @BlondeHistorian
Also, side note... pointing isn’t helpful for people with low vision... I can sometimes see the movement but often it’s disorientating rather than helpful! Try saying “it’s on your left” or “at 3 o clock” or “3 feet in front of you on your right hand side”. Not “over there!”
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Dr Amy Kavanagh 3h
Replying to @saizai
Yes I do the same. In this instance though I thought the seat was clear! I should do the seat sweep but I find sometimes this results in my arm being yanked down by a grabber.
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Dr Amy Kavanagh 3h
Replying to @BlondeHistorian
Video from Amy’s perspective, camera looks down at her white cane. Amy stands on a train platform, a train has arrived & the doors open. Amy asks where the train is going & many people walk by without answering her. Eventually someone stops & answers. Amy boards the train.
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Dr Amy Kavanagh 4h
I am visually impaired & use a long white cane. There wasn't an announcement so I needed to know the destination of the train. Unfortunately I had to ask twice before anyone would tell me. If a disabled person asks for help don't ignore them.
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Dr Amy Kavanagh retweeted
Ellis Palmer May 21
Keen to hear from anyone who needs a Changing Places toilet about their experiences and the difference having one in public places makes to their lives for a BBC News piece. Especially keen to hear from women. Slide into my DMs or drop me an email at ellis.palmer@bbc.co.uk!
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Dr Amy Kavanagh 19h
Replying to @YingHuiThe
I don’t understand where this comment has come from? I don’t mention Councillors? Although it is the responsibility of local government to maintain pavements including tactile paving.
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Dr Amy Kavanagh May 20
Replying to @CIssyvoo
Yes that’s usually the first question. How awful for you to have to constantly answer it! And often when I say I was born visually impaired they will say “such a shame, is there nothing they can do?”
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Dr Amy Kavanagh May 20
If you want to learn more about tactile pavements & why it’s important not to block them like this, then watch this short video I made with
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Dr Amy Kavanagh May 20
Replying to @NotOurCat
I mean stuff like kale, going vegan, essential oils or yoga. Like not actual medical interventions, not that these are any less problematic. But no one has ever told me I just need to exercise my blindness away... like they say to people with chronic illnesses.
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Dr Amy Kavanagh May 20
Replying to @CIssyvoo
Solidarity pal. I still get nonsense about medical interventions, like “gosh! I’ve never thought of asking my doctor about the blindness... guess I should go do that!” But no one has told me to exercise my blindness away... yet.
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Dr Amy Kavanagh May 20
Replying to @MyHappyScales
Video linked here
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Dr Amy Kavanagh May 20
Replying to @AlisonEarl2
Well the woman coming towards him with the big white stick should’ve been a clue...
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Dr Amy Kavanagh May 20
Replying to @MyHappyScales
Learn all about tactile paving in this video & article I did with the bbc!
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Dr Amy Kavanagh May 20
Replying to @GdVikki
Thanks, I’m doing ok.
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Dr Amy Kavanagh May 20
Replying to @notwaving
Still... they’re violating your space & risking damaging your wheelchair. It’s not ok.
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Dr Amy Kavanagh May 20
Replying to @notwaving
Yup. I know. I’ve had bruises from “helpers”. Someone kindly tried to drag me into moving traffic the other day.
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Dr Amy Kavanagh May 20
Replying to @notwaving
Urgh I’m so sorry this happened.
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Dr Amy Kavanagh retweeted
hot takes & iced coffee May 18
Replying to @notwaving
This is what wheelchair users face constantly. If we don't accept unwanted help, or ask people to stop, we're "being rude". The innocent party was "only trying to help". But what about the rudeness of grabbing someone's wheelchair without asking?
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