Twitter | Search | |
Morgan Jackson
PhD candidate , fascinated by flies (), biodiversity & taxonomy. Co-host of . Telling the story of biodiversity, one species at a time.
48,506
Tweets
2,294
Following
7,975
Followers
Tweets
Morgan Jackson 1h
Probably can’t make the seminar since it’s my heavy teaching day, but mind if I sit in on ?
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson 5h
Replying to @JG_NeuroSci
Great finds! It's so weird that there's so much attribution but so little evidence it was actually Linnaeus who wrote it...
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson retweeted
Jitte 5h
Replying to @BioInFocus
Here's a French 1779 text that seems to be quoting it (without attribution):
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson 5h
Replying to @dpsSpiders
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson 6h
When the moon hits your eye Like a sheep nose bot fly That's Opthalmomyiasis
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson retweeted
Viktor Baranov 6h
So, have you been ever wondering, are there any insects which are active during the winter? No? You know all about winter -active aquatic insects? Well...let me tell ya' anyway...
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson 6h
Replying to @BioInFocus
I found a similar sentiment from Pliny the Elder ("Nature is to be found in her entirety nowhere more than in her smallest creations" – ) that may have been the inspiration, but I can't find the exact quote from Linnaeus himself.
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson 6h
For the life of me I can't find where Linnaeus said/wrote this quote. I've found it attributed to him as early as 1868, but I can't find where it came from originally. Ideas?
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson retweeted
Manfred R. Ulitzka 8h
Natura maxime miranda in minimis - Nature is greatest in little things (Carl von Linné) Stunning structures of (Thysanoptera)
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson retweeted
Arron watson 9h
When you are talking to students about ocelli present/absent and you can’t even find them until the students are gone and you remember they are on top of the eye hidden away on this species: Family Mycetophilidae - Fungus gnats
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson 8h
Replying to @StephenBHeard
Relevant ICZN reference is Article 31 (); no mention or discussion of "patronym", "matronym" or "eponym", so I'd say go with the language you prefer.
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson 9h
Replying to @dpsSpiders @ymilesz
140 characters was going to be hard, but I think I could fit the necessary info into 280. Would be an abbreviated description, but enough to establish the name (and precedent).
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson 10h
Replying to @dpsSpiders @ymilesz
lol I've referenced tweets in a couple of papers. I wanted the Tweet to be the publication of record for a name for eternity ;)
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson 10h
Replying to @dpsSpiders @ymilesz
Right, but then that document containing the screenshot & replicated text is the publication (which would be registered with ZooBank), not the tweet itself
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson 10h
Replying to @dpsSpiders @ymilesz
I've been thinking about & planning to do it for awhile, so was pretty annoyed when the LoC changed their archival strategy lol Missed my opportunity!
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson 10h
Replying to @dpsSpiders @ymilesz
Unfortunately, the Library of Congress announced that they were no longer archiving all Tweets as of Jan 1 2018, so it's no longer a valid publication outlet (without significant gymnastics about archiving that I don't think would work)
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson 10h
Replying to @dpsSpiders @ymilesz
Otherwise, it was archived (or at least intended to be archived) in the US Library of Congress, and was uneditable. Register in ZooBank, include your LSID, and you're good to go
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson 10h
Replying to @dpsSpiders @ymilesz
You guys joke, but up until Jan 1 2018, I'm 90% sure Twitter was a "legal" publication venue for new names. All I needed to confirm was whether Twitter has an ISSN
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson 13h
Replying to @StephenBHeard
Embarrassingly, it never occurred to me that there was a gender neutral term for honorifics, and have always defaulted to “patronym”. Will be shifting my own usage now though!
Reply Retweet Like
Morgan Jackson retweeted
Dr Bryan Lessard Feb 22
🛑Job alert!🛑 Want to join our lab as a in our pollinator network study? ✅experience w/ plants or insects ✅high throughput molecular labwork ✅familiar w/ bioinformatics Closes 18 Mar AEDT
Reply Retweet Like