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Benjamin Herold
1/ I spent the past couple months trying to understand how and why companies are trying to measure, monitor, and mold students' feelings, mindsets, and ways of thinking. You know what that means...thread incoming.
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Benjamin Herold Jun 13
Replying to @BenjaminBHerold
2/ First, let's look at some of the companies & researchers doing this work.
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Benjamin Herold Jun 13
3/ Like . A team of academics, funded by an $8.9m grant, have used the online platform to anonymously collect the clicks and keystrokes of 200,000 Fla. students. The goal: teach the software to pinpoint when kids feel happy, bored, or engaged.
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Benjamin Herold Jun 13
Replying to @PanoramaEd
4/ And , which has raised $32m in VC. Each year, the company administers online surveys to ~7m students in 8,500 schools. That means a huge central database of kids' responses to questions about , , emotion regulation, social awareness, and more...
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Benjamin Herold Jun 13
Replying to @spokaneschools
5/...Panorama also feeds back to districts like their own info, which is used to help make a variety of decisions. “As we get more & more information from kids, I think we’ll respond to each student better & better,” said Spokane's director of assessment.
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Benjamin Herold Jun 13
6/ There are also newer companies, like San Francisco-based startup Emote, a recent graduate of the accelerator. Here's a video explaining the Emote app, which allows school staff to record & share observations of students' feelings in real time.
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Benjamin Herold Jun 13
Replying to @BenjaminBHerold
7/ “I think this is a really exciting vision of what school can look like,” Emote CEO Julian Golder said. “There’s more interest than we can handle at this point.”
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Benjamin Herold Jun 13
Replying to @mursionlearn
8/ And then there's a dizzying array of emerging technologies...like , which is starting to work with public schools to use its virtual reality simulations for things like helping autistic students develop social-emotional skills .
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Benjamin Herold Jun 13
Replying to @BenjaminBHerold
9/ Or the FOCI--a wearable that clips to the waistband, tracks your breathing, and tells when you're focused or stressed. The app is billed as a "focus-enhancing mind coach." A press release billed it as a cure for digital distractions in the classroom.
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Benjamin Herold Jun 13
Replying to @BenjaminBHerold
10/ And researchers like Sidney D'Mello & his team at the Emotive Computing Lab are doing cutting-edge work w/ eye-trackers, facial expression scanning, machine learning, and "intelligent tutors."
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Benjamin Herold Jun 13
Replying to @JIMSEDU
11/ What does it all mean? of the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative is at the fore of efforts to make sense of this new landscape...
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Benjamin Herold Jun 13
Replying to @BenjaminBHerold
12/ ...Shelton said kids' growth/learning encompasses physical, mental-health, identity, cognitive, social-emotional, & academic development. “Unless you understand how they are relating to each other, it is very difficult to optimize any of them.”
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Benjamin Herold Jun 13
Replying to @EvieBlad
13/ But Shelton and others also acknowledge it's an open question whether can reliably measure any skiills...an issue explored in-depth in this must-read piece by my colleague .
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Benjamin Herold Jun 13
14/ And critics like of take a broader view, raising concerns re: privacy & liberty. “The idea of telling children that even their feelings are not private & that we’re going to constantly surveil them & analyze them, is just un-American,” she said.
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Benjamin Herold Jun 13
Replying to @BenPatrickWill
15/ University of Stirling lecturer also raised the specter of Facebook/Cambridge Analytica-style behavior modification, targeted at students
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Benjamin Herold Jun 13
Replying to @caselorg
16/ Add it all up, and K-12 is walking a tightrope, ably summed up by Jeremy Taylor, the director of assessment at ...
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Benjamin Herold Jun 13
Replying to @BenjaminBHerold
17/ “ is really about building relationships & communities,” Taylor said. “We hope ed tech can support that, but we have to make sure things are done in a way that is responsible and not outpacing people’s comfort with what is happening in their schools,”
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Benjamin Herold Jun 13
Replying to @BenjaminBHerold
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Joseph Jerome Jun 13
Replying to @BenjaminBHerold
Bravo! Great story.
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sir me if ur bb calls me daddy Jun 13
I wish they'd use it to teach everyone else to leave us alone.
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