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Beau Willimon
Writer/Producer/Playwright (creator THE FIRST on , screenwriter of MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS)
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Beau Willimon 9h
Congrats for your supporting actress nomination for ! So thrilled for you and proud of your majestic performance.
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Beau Willimon 10h
So proud to have worked with the extraordinary on this film. She is as talented as she is glamorous.
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Beau Willimon 10h
2018: A Paris Odyssey
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Beau Willimon retweeted
Writers Guild of America, East 11h
“Most crucially, our unit continues to be outraged by management’s inclusion of a right-to-work clause, a technique designed to degrade the legitimacy of our union.”
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Beau Willimon 11h
The is proud to support and stand in solidarity with our sisters and brothers at . Union strong ✊️
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Beau Willimon 11h
Friends, listen to my pal Blake Mills’ () new album LOOK. Critically praised and deservedly so. It’s epic, gorgeous and deeply felt. Every song is sublime, but the track “Four” really got me. Check it out:
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Beau Willimon Dec 9
Replying to @BeauWillimon
Opps, messed up the ordering of this thread a little bit. You gotta go back to the previous tweet's replies to see the rest of the thread. Apologies!
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Beau Willimon Dec 9
Replying to @BeauWillimon
Also, here's an earlier thread about a few more terrific scenes from films I've seen recently:
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Beau Willimon Dec 9
Replying to @BeauWillimon
Okay! That was a long thread! Thanks Monsieur Insomnia, and to any of you that got this far. These are all wonderful films and you should check them out if you haven't already. I'd also be curious to hear about scenes that you love from films past & present.
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Beau Willimon Dec 9
Replying to @BeauWillimon
The filming becomes part of the story, and it creates a profound tension between the very private, personal fulfillment of the climber and his conflicting desire to immortalize this death-defying pursuit, with the film crew stuck in the middle.
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Beau Willimon Dec 9
Replying to @BeauWillimon
Sometimes when filmmakers insert themselves into a doc it can feel overbearing and distract from the subject. But in this film it adds a necessary layer which helps us engage with an endeavor many might find impossible to understand…
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Beau Willimon Dec 9
Replying to @BeauWillimon
The anxiety of the filmmakers gives us full permission to experience our anxiety with them. Rather than take a purely fly-on-the-wall approach, they insert themselves into the film, revealing their own doubts and misgivings, questioning whether they should film at all…
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Beau Willimon Dec 9
Replying to @BeauWillimon
His fear is palpable, so intense at times that he can't even look at the monitor to watch what we are watching. Most people in the theater probably know that the climb was successful before the film began, but this makes it feel very much in the present tense…
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Beau Willimon Dec 9
FREE SOLO () When finally makes his attempt to climb El Capitan, we've been primed for the life & death stakes. But rather than just film the climb, the filmmakers also film the filming. Repeatedly we cut back to the long-lens cameraman on the ground…
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Beau Willimon Dec 9
Replying to @BeauWillimon
But what's so great about this scene is how Kayla's active listening is dramatized. How we remain in her POV even when she has very little dialogue. And how it gives us access to her excitement while also creating space for our dread.
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Beau Willimon Dec 9
Replying to @BeauWillimon
We're rooting for her, but we also sense something terrible looming from the seemingly innocuous conversation taking place in the brightly lit food court. We'll see that expectation addressed in heart-breaking car scene to follow…
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Beau Willimon Dec 9
Replying to @boburnham
What I love about this scene is how captures her joy and anxiety, mostly by filming Kayla eagerly listening to the conversation of the older kids. There's something both triumphant and dangerous. Kayla's deep desire to please is both funny and sad…
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Beau Willimon Dec 9
Replying to @eighthgrademov
EIGHTH GRADE () There is a scene in which the protagonist Kayla (@EliseKFisher) has been invited to hang out with high school students at a mall. She's an outsider in middle school & desperately wants high school to be a fresh start. This invitation is a godsend…
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Beau Willimon Dec 9
Replying to @BeauWillimon
But the structural framing, camerawork and humor are also demanding that you be alert. That you pay attention. Letting you know from the get-go that you have signed up for a wild, entertaining, challenging ride, and you won't walk away unscathed.
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Beau Willimon Dec 9
Replying to @BeauWillimon
As a viewer there is nowhere to hide. You are in this story, squarely in the middle of the action. The cinematography says "We're looking at you." The provocative deadpan humor is established right away with sharp, to-the-point dialogue…
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