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Matthew Scott Apr 11
The US charge against Assange is conspiracy, with Chelsea Manning, to commit computer intrusion, in particular by breaking a US government computer password. The maximum sentence is 5 years imprisonment.
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Matthew Scott
Under the 2003 US - UK Extradition Treaty, Assange can only be tried in the US for the offence for which he is extradited.
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Steve Morgan Apr 11
Replying to @Barristerblog
Could he be arrested on new charges by the US after the trial/jail sentence ends?
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Steve Morgan Apr 11
Replying to @Barristerblog
Basing my view on this episode of law and order SVU
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Matthew Scott Apr 11
Replying to @srm1977
Not unless the UK consents, or it's an offence committed after the extradition. I suppose there's a potential complication with Sweden, though I guess the rules there are very similar.
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Fido Johnson Apr 11
Replying to @Barristerblog
But why would Assange trust the US to abide by the treaty? Or the UK to take action if the US was in breach? We live in unstable political times.
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Lauren Alderβ“‹ Apr 11
Replying to @Barristerblog
I imagine the US could violate this treaty with impunity, and without eliciting any complaint from the UK's supine authorities. To quote James Madison, it's provisions are merely 'parchment barriers against the encroaching spirit of power.'
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Matthew Scott Apr 11
Replying to @LaurenAlder
Nothing's impossible but it would be stupid of them to do so because then no-one would trust them with extraditions in the future.
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Olly Huntsman Apr 11
Replying to @Barristerblog
So he has served roughly twice as long in the Ecuadorean Embassy?
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Michael Lane πŸ‡ͺπŸ‡Ί Apr 11
Replying to @Barristerblog
Is this the *only* offence he is charged with? If there's any risk of him facing further charges (and potentially receiving the death penalty) then I assume that his counsel will be challenging the extradition.
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Matthew Scott Apr 11
Replying to @mchaellane
That's the only one at present.
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Mark πŸ‡ͺπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§πŸ‡²πŸ‡Ή Brexit is Bollox! Apr 11
The extradition treaty wuth the USA has seenrd very unbalanced in the past
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Steve Peers Apr 11
Not on this issue though. The specialty rule is standard practice in extradition treaties. Even the EAW only chips away at it a little.
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Mark πŸ‡ͺπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§πŸ‡²πŸ‡Ή Brexit is Bollox! Apr 11
Appalling typing!
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GazHay Apr 11
Whilst all this is very true, it would not be out of character from a certain President to do whatever he wants and ignore the consequences.
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Michael O'Connor Apr 11
Replying to @Barristerblog
Hmm. 'A differently denominated offense based on the same facts ...' does seem to allow at least the possibility of upping a charge. On the same facts of me waving a knife at someone I could be accused of anything from threatening behaviour to attempted murder.
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Roy Grubb Apr 11
This present US Administration is ... unusual.
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Max / Foorack Apr 12
Yes, similar to the rape and molestation investigation in Sweden, any sentence he would have been given (if any) would have been over long time ago by now.
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Olly Huntsman Apr 12
Replying to @Foorack @Barristerblog
Smh
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Louise Mensch Apr 12
That’s not true, and you should show the succeeding text that proves it’s not true, instead of cherry picking selectively to give a false impression.
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