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Badlands Nat'l Park
Official feed of Badlands NP.. Protecting rugged scenery, fossil beds, 244,000 acres of mixed-grass prairie & wildlife. RT/follow/likes≠endorsement
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Badlands Nat'l Park Sep 19
that South Dakota is also known as the coyote state? Love ‘em or hate ‘em, coyotes are amazingly adaptable and are all about their families.
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Badlands Nat'l Park Sep 17
Is it a bird? No! Is it a plane? No! Oh my gosh it's... both!
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Badlands Nat'l Park Sep 14
While Badlands National Park has lots of fossils, we have no dinosaur fossils. We were under the Western Interior Seaway at that time.
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Badlands Nat'l Park Sep 10
Much of the Badlands' South Unit was part of a bombing range from the 1940s until 1960s. It is not uncommon to find evidence of a time when this usually quiet and serene landscape exploded with light and sound. Please report any suspected unexploded ordinance to a ranger.
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Badlands Nat'l Park Sep 4
Important Notice: Tuesday, September 11 and Thursday, September 13, 2018, the Ben Reifel Visitor Center will be undergoing electrical work and will be without power at the visitor center for extended periods of time.
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Badlands Nat'l Park Sep 4
**Construction Alert** Over the next three weeks, parts of the Big Badlands Overlook walkway and parking lot will be inaccessible due to re-paving. The overlook will remain open, but please watch your step and steer clear of the inaccessible areas.
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Badlands Nat'l Park Sep 1
Save the date! In two weeks, ethnobotanist and former park ranger Richard Sherman will be leading a guided hike to the top of Cedar Butte in the South Unit of the park. This is a strenuous hike which requires reservations. Please call 605-455-2878 to secure a spot!
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Badlands Nat'l Park Aug 27
Happy ! Whether they’re pollinating flowers or eating mosquitoes, bats are an important part of the environment! Take a moment today to appreciate all the things these little guys do for us.
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Badlands Nat'l Park Aug 25
! Help us celebrate our 102nd birthday. Join us for cake, ice cream, and lemonade at the Cedar Pass Lodge. Any birthday wishes for us?
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Badlands Nat'l Park Aug 21
“The world is big and I want to have a good look at it before it gets dark.” –John Muir .
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Badlands Nat'l Park Aug 17
Join us this weekend for our annual Heritage Celebration. Bring your dancing shoes for Lakota dancing demonstrations throughout the weekend and stay with us Saturday evening for special ranger program at the Cedar Pass Campground Amphitheater. See our schedule for details.
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Badlands Nat'l Park Aug 16
What did the buffalo say to its son on the first day of school? Bi-son! It’s ! Think you’ve got a better one? Leave it in the comments below- remember we are a family-friendly account!
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Badlands Nat'l Park Aug 15
Notch Trail is now open!!
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Badlands Nat'l Park Aug 8
Notch Trail is closed until further notice. Repairs are in progress so we can reopen the trail quickly. In the meantime, please stop by the Ben Reifel Visitor Center for help selecting another hike during your visit.
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Badlands Nat'l Park Aug 7
Correction - The Notch Trail will be closed beginning this evening.
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Badlands Nat'l Park Aug 7
The Notch Trail will be closed beginning Wednesday (August 8) morning until repairs to the ladder can be made
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Badlands Nat'l Park Aug 6
August is “American Adventures Month!” Where will you go? Might we suggest a national park or two?
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Badlands Nat'l Park Aug 3
How do off-duty rangers enjoy their time? Exploring the park of course!
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Badlands Nat'l Park Aug 2
This Friday marks the start of the 2018 Rally in Strugis, SD. As you travel through South Dakota, be extra mindful while driving and keep an eye out for motorcycles.
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Badlands Nat'l Park Jul 24
Many generations of Lakota have used the Curly Cup Gum Weed to treat poison ivy. They use the sticky sap on the outside of the plant and rub it onto the afflicted area for relief. These are home remedies that work!
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