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Badgergate
We wonder why people aren't happy that England is the heartland of the European badger? We wonder why some only value something that's endangered. We wonder why on an island, impoverished in wildlife terms, why people don't celebrate badgers as a success?
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Alick Simmons Aug 29
Replying to @Badgergate
It's a mystery. I am equally baffled by the oft-heard cry of 'There's too many [insert species name]'. And that's it - in a sentence dripping with prejudice and an absence of evidence - sufficient justification to kill a few (or a lot) of said species.
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TB Free (England) Aug 29
Never hear anyone call out non-compliance though, do you? But the vocal few are always there to find fault with nature...
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Rosie Woodroffe Aug 31
Replying to @Badgergate
Indeed. When I suggested that if the uk was to encourage African farmers to coexist with elephants it should also encourage its own farmers to coexist with badgers, I got some of the worst trolling I've experienced.
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Rimfire Aug 31
Hardly surprising
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Phil  Latham Aug 31
That's because there's no equivalence & it's a daft comparison, using badgers as proxies for wars you can't win easily is just a displacement behaviour
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Alick Simmons Aug 31
There's a special form of hypocrisy reserved for politicians travelling the world preaching wildlife conservation and protection when they can't or won't do the same thing at home.
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Alick Simmons Aug 31
So it's 'a daft comparison' ? Do elaborate, please.
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Phil  Latham Aug 31
One is endangered the other has a booming population with no long term threats whatsoever
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Alick Simmons Aug 31
Which was once said about the passenger pigeon, the North American bison, the great auk, etc, etc, ad nauseum.
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Phil  Latham Aug 31
The dodo died, it is extinct, that doesn't mean all birds will be extinct, using the badger as a proxy for justified environmental battles simply dilutes the effort that could be made for farm more worthy and deserving cases
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Alick Simmons Aug 31
Endemic species on small, isolated islands need special measures. eg Inaccessible Rail. In contrast, my examples are formerly abundant species where the ethos of 'one more won't hurt' was what did for them.
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Phil  Latham Aug 31
You cannot in all seriousness think that badgers long term futures are threatened in any way, there's no desire from farmers to eliminate badgers, I think most want to coexist happily with them as long as they pose no TB risk
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Alick Simmons Aug 31
That sounds like another quote from around the same time.
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Phil  Latham Aug 31
Honestly, this isn't really a consideration, whats needed is a lowering of population density to levels which prevent the sustainability of infection in the absence of other sources.
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Gethin Jones Aug 31
Whatever the ins and outs of the badger/TB argument, the fact remains that there is no conservation concern over the badger as a UK species. Claims to the contrary do those wishing to protect badgers, for whatever reason, no favours.
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The Badger Cull Support our Farmers Aug 31
Er.... we think the answer is hidden on this link.
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Rosie Woodroffe Aug 31
I have spent much of my professional life in Africa. Elephants are globally endangered but locally abundant, they are a huge pain to live with. Had they lived in the uk they would have been extirpated hundreds of years ago.
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Rosie Woodroffe Aug 31
If uk govt wants to ask farmers far poorer than uk farmers to live with a threat far more damaging than uk farmers face, uk govt should also assist uk farmers to coexist with uk wildlife
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Alick Simmons Aug 31
That's clearly not the view of everyone advocating the killing of badgers. What does think?
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