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Astronomy Magazine
The best-selling astronomy magazine
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Astronomy Magazine 10m
Although Jupiter is large as planets go, it would need to be about 75 times its current mass to ignite nuclear fusion in its core and become a star.
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Astronomy Magazine 40m
Could untold types of neutrinos account for dark matter?
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Astronomy Magazine 1h
Fifteen things you need to know before buying a telescope.
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Astronomy Magazine 2h
The death blast of a star some 200 times the mass of the Sun, challenges theories about how such massive stars die.
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Astronomy Magazine 3h
Birthed in the first second after the Big Bang, primordial black holes could offer answers to astronomers’ outstanding questions ... if they exist.
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Astronomy Magazine 3h
Computer modeling now allows researchers to simulate solar flares and the complex processes that generate them.
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Astronomy Magazine 4h
Ten billion years ago, our galaxy ate one of its smaller neighbors.
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Astronomy Magazine 4h
Giant planets circling their suns in a matter of days could form in place, rather than migrating inward, as previously thought.
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Astronomy Magazine 5h
Our galaxy formed from past mergers, and it will be the scene of many to come.
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Astronomy Magazine 5h
The concept of black holes goes all the way back to the 1780s.
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Astronomy Magazine 6h
For most of recorded history, the answer was simple: The universe has always existed and always will. Few people challenged the dogma or even suspected it might not be true.
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Astronomy Magazine 6h
The key question is: Did galaxies, stars, or black holes come first?
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Astronomy Magazine 7h
To map the universe, astronomers string together distance measurements to ever-farther objects, like climbing rungs on a cosmic ladder.
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Astronomy Magazine 7h
Take a look inside supermassive black holes, spinning in the hearts of galaxies.
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Astronomy Magazine 8h
Florida clams suggest a previously unknown asteroid struck Earth long ago.
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Astronomy Magazine 8h
Intermediate-mass black holes split the difference between puny black holes (<~100 solar masses) and supermassive black holes (up to billions of solar masses). And though evidence for the cosmic middleweights is still scarce, the case is growing
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Astronomy Magazine 9h
If we wish to colonize another world, finding a planet with a gravitational field that humans can survive and thrive under will be crucial.
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Astronomy Magazine 9h
Craters on Mercury offer refuge to glaciers that otherwise would have melted eons ago.
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Astronomy Magazine 10h
A slow motion nightmare:
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Astronomy Magazine 10h
The Yin-Yang Walnut
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