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Anthropocene
A print, digital, and live magazine exploring how we can create a sustainable human age we actually want to live in. A publication of
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Anthropocene May 17
A global map of manure lays bare a load of missed opportunities Researchers have created a map that shows the spread of manure across the planet - revealing it to be a vast untapped source of phosphorus, a dwindling nutrient that’s essential for enriching
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Anthropocene May 16
New plastic closes the recycling loop An astounding 91 percent of plastic is not recycled. Part of the reason for the world’s dismal recycling rate is that lack of collection and recycling infrastructure.
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Anthropocene May 15
Restoring keystone species persecuted as pests Among the distinctive ecological characteristics of Anthropocene-era Homo sapiens is a predilection for destroying keystone species:
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Anthropocene May 14
The surprising interplay between climate change and fertility Climate change will shape every aspect of human life – often in complex ways. Take the question of deciding how many children to have, for example.
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Anthropocene May 10
A sensor that monitors milk’s freshness in real time could dramatically reduce waste Researchers have developed a new technique that can pinpoint, in real-time, the moment at which milk spoils inside a carton.
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Anthropocene May 9
What if air conditioners could be retrofitted to capture carbon? The planet is warming. And incomes are rising around the world. That means more people using air-conditioners, causing yet more greenhouse gas emissions and warming. It’s a scary spiral.
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Anthropocene May 8
Building bridges between conservationists and cat people Few conservation issues are more polarizing than the impact of free-ranging domestic cats on wild animals, particularly birds.
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Anthropocene May 7
The breakdown of biodegradable plastic, broken down Half of all plastics currently produced are used only once before being discarded. These single-use plastics make up a large proportion of litter both on land and in the ocean.
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Anthropocene May 3
Why meal kits are greener than the average grocery shop The carbon footprint of meal kits—precisely-portioned, pre-packaged ingredients delivered to consumers who want to cook fuss-free meals—is 1/3 lower than cooking meals from regular, store-bought groc
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Anthropocene May 2
Four strategies to reduce the carbon footprint of plastic compared A new study published in Nature Climate Change explores ways to cut the carbon footprint of plastic.
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Anthropocene May 1
Q: What’s missing from forest carbon accounting? A: Animals The centerpiece of humanity’s plans to fight climate change by ending deforestation, best known by the acronym of REDD+—short for Reducing Emissions From Deforestation and Forest Degradation, plu
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Anthropocene Apr 30
Cold-blooded sea-life living on the edge in a warming world Twice as many marine species as terrestrial species have already experienced local extinctions due to a warming climate. The conclusion emerges from a massive analysis of previously published da
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Anthropocene Apr 26
Here’s how precision agriculture could help farmers reduce fertilizer use A newly-applied technology could help farmers identify consistently low-yielding parts of their cropland, and dramatically reduce the needless application of fertilizers there, a ne
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Anthropocene Apr 25
Snow-Powered Generator Could Provide Winter Boost for Solar Panels Spring is in the air. But just a month ago, solar panels in parts of the country were covered with snow, the slightest dusting of which makes their output plummet.
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Anthropocene Apr 24
Are dingoes just feral dogs? Australia’s dingoes are both iconic and shrouded in mystery: were the dogs’ ancestors, introduced to the continent at least 5,000 years ago by unknown Asian seafarers, domesticated? Should modern-day dingoes be considered fera
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Anthropocene Apr 24
Are dingoes just feral dogs? Australia’s dingoes are both iconic and shrouded in mystery: were the dogs’ ancestors, introduced to the continent at least 5,000 years ago by unknown Asian seafarers, domesticated? Should modern-day dingoes be considered fera
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Anthropocene Apr 23
City trees reduce daytime heat. But to curb sweltering nights, minimize pavement. Planting trees is generally thought to be a good strategy for mitigating the urban heat island effect, the tendency for cities to be several degrees warmer than surrounding
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Anthropocene Apr 19
Feeding plant food to farmed fish isn’t as green as it seems Increasing the proportion of plant-based feed in the diets of farmed fish could drive higher rates of freshwater use, land use, and fertilizer pollution, a new study finds.
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Anthropocene Apr 18
With more and more EVs on the road, will be breath easier? Electric vehicles have a small but fast-growing share of the car market.
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Anthropocene Apr 17
Urban “wastelands” are a paradise for bees A growing appreciation of how bees can thrive in urban environments has led many city dwellers to protect their habitat.
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