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Andrew Yang🧢
Google achieving quantum computing is a huge deal. It means, among many other things, that no code is uncrackable.
Its quantum computer can solve tasks that are otherwise unsolvable, a report says.
CNET CNET @CNET
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Andrew Yang🧢 Sep 20
Replying to @AndrewYang
We need to catch up with our approach to encryption
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Jessica Kim 🧢 Sep 20
Replying to @AndrewYang
Can anyone imagine Biden, Sanders, or Warren speaking to this? Yang is the only one with a pulse on the 21st century.
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Rhett Cryptography Sep 20
Bitcoin is still safe from quantum attacks with P2SK addresses
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Jonabel Belz Sep 20
are you for 2020 election? Am just wondering aloud
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Rhett Cryptography Sep 20
We don’t get a vote for USA president in Puerto Rico 🇵🇷
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Jonabel Belz Sep 20
Yeah am aware of that but we do idolise candidate. 😊
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Andrew Yang Fan Page🧢 Sep 20
Replying to @AndrewYang
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Andrew Yang Fan Page🧢 Sep 20
Replying to @AndrewYang
Don’t forget to follow this account to help us get to 10,000 followers by the end of today!
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🗽💰TheDividendReport🧢 Sep 20
Replying to @AndrewYang
Are u saying I need to change my password to something other than hunter2
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Yang's Ghost Leg 🧢🇺🇸🖖 Sep 20
Suggestion: G8%7■○8gP7&t4@■&7h8P6$÷/♧{6ge7U
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Ken Warner 🧢 Sep 20
needs more emojis
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Woman Logic Sep 20
Replying to @AndrewYang
That’s just not true.
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Jaron Gubernick🧢 Sep 20
Replying to @verebellum @AndrewYang
Actually it is. The most popular encryption methods (eg RSA) rely on the assumption that it is difficult to factor the product of two very large prime numbers. However, using quantum computing algorithms, factoring integers is fairly easy. Hence it breaks the encryptions.
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OnlyForF1 🧢 Sep 20
There are encryption algorithms that are already immune to being decrypted by quantum computers :)
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Jaron Gubernick🧢 Sep 20
For now. But we're still fairly early on in the computing game. For instance, what might an advanced AI be able to accomplish if it's instructed to hack into a "secure" system? We just don't know.
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Ben 🎃 Bartlett Sep 20
There are encryption models that are provably information-theoretically secure against quantum computers. It’s not a matter of “we don’t know”.
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Jaron Gubernick🧢 Sep 20
And what if there are other forms of computation beyond just binary and quantum? For instance, neural networks seem to operate on fundamentally different principles, and we're only just beginning to wrap our minds around what they can do.
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Ben 🎃 Bartlett Sep 20
Neural networks operate on a subset of classical computation because classical computer can efficiently emulate them.
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Jaron Gubernick🧢 Sep 20
The human brain is something that exists in the real world which can perform tasks that no existing computer running any existing algorithm can accomplish. We don't know what's possible. Personally, I prefer a philosophical stance of humility when staring into the great unknown.
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