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Andy Coravos @ RSAC
Wait. strategically *withholds* "likes" from users that they believe might disengage hoping they'll be disappointed and recheck the app?! Harvesting painful insecurities. This is so messed up.
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Andy Coravos @ RSAC 12 Jan 18
Replying to @instagram @Twitter
Apparently uses a similar approach. You'll notice there is a short delay after the page loads for when the # of notifications bubble appears. WTF. Small trickery. Source:
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Andy Coravos @ RSAC 12 Jan 18
Replying to @AndreaCoravos
And a nice reminder of what all this tech is doing to society.
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Andy Coravos @ RSAC 14 Jan 18
Replying to @mikeyk @instagram
UPDATE (1): Adding in , CTO of 's response to this Tweet below. Including this b/c it's important to break the cycle of incomplete/false information. 👇
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Andy Coravos @ RSAC 14 Jan 18
Replying to @jack
UPDATE (2): Given the new information, there should be mechanism to "recall" the original Tweet to stop the spread. I don't believe in deleting tweets. You should be able to examine its history/context. Newspapers have a way to make "corrections"; Twitter should, too.
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Andy Coravos @ RSAC 14 Jan 18
Replying to @JediJeremy
UPDATE (3): As noted, there is a difference between *cause* (e.g., delayed "likes" due to a technical constraint) and *social effect*. Even if the emotional outcome (disappointment/insecurity) isn't *intentional*, it doesn't make the social effect acceptable.
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Andy Coravos @ RSAC 14 Jan 18
Replying to @instagram
UPDATE (4): Reading the comments/replies, there's a lot more going on here than whether the "delayed likes" and "batched notifications" on are intentional or not. Emotional manipulation by technology, even if unintentional, is impacting us.
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Andy Coravos @ RSAC 14 Jan 18
Replying to @Twitter @Facebook and 4 others
UPDATE (5): Deleting the original Tweet does not solve all of the problems. This is a system/product failure. We need a better (, ) product design for humans. If you want to see change, use this exchange as an example.
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Andy Coravos @ RSAC 14 Jan 18
Replying to @UseDopamine
UPDATE (6): Worth reading 's response. Social media companies choose how and when to send out the "bundles" of notifications.
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Andy Coravos @ RSAC 3 Mar 18
Replying to @AndreaCoravos
UPDATE (7): Wrote up 2 post-mortems from this frustrating/unpleasant experience of going viral 1/On the side-effects of the attention economy: 2/On Twitter's design flaw that stunts healthy, civil, productive conversations online:
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Andy Coravos @ RSAC 16 Jan 18
Replying to @mikeyk @instagram
Thanks for the clarification for inside app "likes". How are outside-of-app (e.g., iOS/Android) push notifications optimized? I've gotten notifications saying someone has “liked” a photo hours after the “like” showed up in the app. Is this a bug or a feature?
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