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Dr. Alistair Dove
Marine Biologist/Conservationist . Celebrating the extraordinary diversity of life, esp . These tweets be mine, arrrr!
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Dr. Alistair Dove 6h
Among the cunningfish aka butterflyfish, near Sugarloaf. The most common fish on the island, it is found nowhere else in the world
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Dr. Alistair Dove 8h
Doing my best impersonation of a cunningfish, aka Helena butterflyfish. @ St Helena Island
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Marine Megafauna Feb 23
Stunning!
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Dr. Alistair Dove Feb 23
Replying to @LaurenBWeekes
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Dr. Alistair Dove Feb 23
Awesome! I miss digeneans, such awesome life histories...
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Dr. Alistair Dove Feb 23
No, she's going to instead
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Dr. Alistair Dove Feb 23
Flightless cormorants are another extraordinary endemic species in the Islands of…
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Neal Rajput Feb 23
Replying to @AlistairDove
These are so so beautiful..
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Dr. Alistair Dove Feb 23
Steibeck apparently wrote of them: "If you walk slowly, they move slowly ahead of you in droves. If you hurry, they hurry. When you plunge at them, they seem to disappear in a puff of blue smoke—at any rate, they disappear. It is impossible to creep up on them."
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Dr. Alistair Dove Feb 23
Replying to @DrKatfish
I was thinking more like "ooooh, yeah....a bit to the left..."
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Howard I. Browman Feb 22
Funded postdoc position with the Institute of Marine Research in Bergen, Norway -
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Dr. Alistair Dove Feb 23
Bold lil' guys too...
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Dr. Alistair Dove Feb 23
There's one we see in St Helena too, but that's definitely a central Atlantic endemic, Grapsus adscensionis. This pic is from Judith Brown's book.
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Dr. Alistair Dove Feb 22
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Dr. Alistair Dove Feb 22
Replying to @LaurenBWeekes
Those buggers are terrifying! You've seen them eating birds right?
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Dr. Alistair Dove Feb 22
The bilirubin is enzymatically reduced to billybaldwin, and then finally oxidized to billyraycyrus...
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Dr. Alistair Dove Feb 22
The little bit I leaned today's suggests mammals can have both. Biliverdin is responsible for the green tones in a bruise & is later metabolized to bilirubin (yellow)
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Douglas Kretzmann Feb 22
my son caught one of those in Greece, locally named zargana. Good eating, the bones were a neon blue.. never saw anything like it before or since..
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Katherine O'Reilly Feb 22
Replying to @AlistairDove
They're just so striking against that black rock!
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Dr. Alistair Dove Feb 22
A couple of nice lizardfish from the expedition. We noticed they were large and reliably in pairs, so I'm assuming it was time. This species is an egg scatterer, providing no parental care to eggs or larvae.
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