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Alexis Coe
Historian 📚Alice+Freda (🎥 '20) & You Never Forget Your First (Washington bio '20)🎙No Man’s Land (Wing) 📺 CNN & consulting producer. Curator 100
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Alexis Coe retweeted
Alex Shephard 10h
Biden boasted about his role in passing the 1994 crime bill in his memoir, which was published 14 months ago
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Alexis Coe retweeted
Steve Cuss 18h
This week I'm joined by to talk Generalized Anxiety, how it impacts life and leadership and most importantly, tools to manage it. Itunes: Stitcher: Google Play:
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Alexis Coe 13h
Replying to @lkoturner
Nothing can keep us apart
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Alexis Coe retweeted
Aminatou Sow Jan 20
The best part? is curating The ACLU’s centennial! ⚡️
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Alexis Coe retweeted
Isaac Fitzgerald🤞🏻🖤 14h
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Alexis Coe retweeted
Aminatou Sow 14h
good morning only to those who would never hold a black woman running for president to a higher standard than white progressive men ✌🏾✌🏾✌🏾✌🏾✌🏾✌🏾
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Alexis Coe 14h
"There are certain moments in your life when you suddenly understand something about yourself. I loved going through those files, making them yield their secrets to me....not filtered, cleaned up, through press releases or, years later, in books."
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Alexis Coe 14h
Replying to @AlexisCoe
He took unpopular stances at the time, all have been widely adopted since: Dr. King was against the Vietnam war, and called for a march on Washington to bring attention to Americans living in poverty.
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Alexis Coe 14h
Replying to @AlexisCoe
After Dr. King received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, attacks against him increased. When he marched in Marquette Park, he passed a white protestor w/a sign that read "King would look good with a knife in his back." He was knocked to the ground that day.
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Alexis Coe 14h
Another thing to remember, in these times: Two-thirds of Americans had an unfavorable opinion of MLK in 1966.
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Alexis Coe 15h
Replying to @AM2DM @theferocity
I've talked about this before, most recently in April on with
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Alexis Coe 15h
Replying to @AlexisCoe
If she could, in the most nascent days of her widowhood, with small children at home mourning the loss of their father, show up to fight, so should everyone else. And on a local level, she’s telling Memphis, and Mayor Loeb, this needs to end. Now. /6
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Alexis Coe 15h
Replying to @AlexisCoe
Mrs. King returned to Memphis on April 8 to participate in a march her husband was scheduled to lead, demonstrating to the world that the Civil Rights movement would not be deterred by the death of its leader. /5
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Alexis Coe 15h
Replying to @AlexisCoe
The letter from the Fire Dept Chief to Coretta is dated April 10, 1968, six days after MLK was assassinated. Coretta wasn’t with him, but came to Memphis, on a plane provided by RFK, to bring MLK's body to Atlanta, and here's what's extraordinary... /4
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Alexis Coe 15h
Replying to @AlexisCoe
This Mayor, Henry Loeb, described integration as “anarchy,” and refused to treat black and white sanitation workers equally. Black workers had little job security, struggled with safety, and were denied dignity, equal pay and benefits. That's why MLK was in town. /3
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Alexis Coe 15h
Replying to @AlexisCoe
The original bill was sent to Mrs. King as Memphis was being condemned by the nation — not just for the assassination, but for the reason MLK had been in Memphis, and the aftermath. “We wish the incident had happened elsewhere— if it had to happen,” said the racist Mayor. /2
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Alexis Coe 15h
After MLK was assassinated, the Memphis Fire Dept Chief sent Coretta Scott King, his widow, a bill for the ambulance ride to the hospital. That letter has disappeared. The apology, in which the Chief asks her to “disregard” the first one quiet, has not. /1
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Alexis Coe 16h
Sarah Sanders: "[MLK] gave his life to right the wrong of racial inequality." He didn't "give his life." He didn't consent to being murdered.
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Alexis Coe retweeted
Jonathan Blitzer Jan 20
Mabel González was separated from her children in September 2017 when the Trump Administration's family-separation policy was underway but still unofficial. From inside a detention center, she observed other mothers entering custody without any idea of where their kids were. 1/
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Alexis Coe retweeted
Rebecca Traister Jan 20
Here’s the video of my Colbert appearance on Friday. Which was both terrifying and fun.
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