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Albanopolis
Account dedicated to the small & unknown with the & .
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Albanopolis Sep 18
Replying to @AlbanologyFacts
The dictionary was named: "lexicon of the simple Romaic (Greek) and Arbanitic (Albanian) language”. The original manuscript of the dictionary is at the French National Library in Paris.
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Albanopolis Sep 18
Replying to @AlbanologyFacts
Under the insistence of François Pouqueville & while he was in Corfu in the "Albanian regiment" (formed by Napoleon) Marko Boçari wrote a Greek-Albanian dictionary. He was surely helped in this task by his family members.
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Albanopolis Sep 18
The most famous souliote was surely Markos Botsaris (in Greek)/Marko Boçari (in Albanian). Highly respected, he is considered a national hero in Greece. He was appointed general of Western Greece during the Greek War of Independence in which he died in combat.
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Albanopolis Sep 17
Replying to @lilidalbanie
I wanted to specify that I was talking about the part of Epirus that belongs today to Greece (the southern part of the region), since the region of Epirus is not only in Greece but also in Albania (divided between both countries).
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Albanopolis Sep 17
Replying to @AlbanologyFacts
Organized in clans (farë), they were particularly famous for their bravery, their relentless struggle for autonomy within the Ottoman Empire & their contribution to the Greek War of Independence. They were surely formed by taking refuge in the mountains when the Ottomans arrived.
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Albanopolis Sep 17
”Souliot warriors pursuing the enemy” by Hughes Thomas, in 1820. The Souliotes were a small sub-group of Southern Orthodox Albanians, living in the Souli mountains, in Greek Epirus.
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Albanopolis Sep 17
Concerning the Dević/Deviç monastery Krasniqi specifies that the monastery itself paid these men for protection. It was surely the case for the others too:
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Albanopolis Sep 17
The same goes for the family that protected the Pejë/Peć patriarchate, it was the family of Zhuj Veseli, also of Catholic ancestry but who became Muslims when they settled in Kosovo. In Drenica, the Dević monastery was protected by a family that took Vojvoda as their last name.
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Albanopolis Sep 17
I found an interesting enough article in Albanian by Mark Krasniqi (maybe the same as the Serbian version). The Vojvodas of the Deçan/Dečan monastery were from the Salih Rrusta’s family, she was once Catholic but became Muslim when she moved in Kosovo.
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Albanopolis Sep 17
Thank you Mihailo. Can you please give me the name of the Mark Krasniqi’s book from which you took the photo you published?
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Albanopolis Sep 17
Very interesting. I will get myself a translator app and get interested in it. In any case if they got paid it’s no surprising at all that they protected them, they were mercenaries in a way.
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Albanopolis Sep 17
As elsewhere in the Balkans, the Muslim Albanians were syncrethic in their religious practices. Islam mingled with Christian practices but also with beliefs rejected in the two monotheistic religions (superstitions).
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Albanopolis Sep 17
Isa Boletini himself (considered a great Albanian national hero) had been paid to protect the Serbian community of Mitrovica as well as the Sokolica monastery. But Boletini did it purely as a mercenary, he was paid by Serbia for it and didn't took the function from his father.
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Albanopolis Sep 17
What I can't find is whether they were paid or not (by Serbs or even by the autonomous Serbian state). At any rate, this activity suited Albanian customs perfectly. Armed guardian of a place seen as sacred, they gave their word of honor (besa) to protect it.
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Albanopolis Sep 17
The Albanian Vojvodas, protectors of Medieval churches and monasteries were actually Muslims. The title was hereditary, it passed from father to son. This phenomenon concerned mainly the western part of Kosovo, Dukagjini (in Albanian)/Metohija (in Serbian).
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Albanopolis Sep 14
Replying to @AlbanologyFacts
Dyrrachium was called ans is still called Durrës by the Albanians. It was undoubtedly the first known major maritime outlet of the Albanians.
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Albanopolis Sep 14
Replying to @AlbanologyFacts
The "barbaric Albanians" (like they are called by two Irish pilgrims in 1322) of the Durrës hinterland/countryside took the opportunity to take control of the city. Although the presence of Venetian traders was still significant.
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Albanopolis Sep 14
Replying to @AlbanologyFacts
This earthquake marks a caesura, a historic break, the ancient starting point of the Via Egnatia was enormously reduced & its region became swampy (conducive to malaria). Until then the city was probably mainly Greek & Venetian. It surely became predominantly Albanian just then.
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Albanopolis Sep 14
In 1269 (possibly 1267) the great and important port city of ancient Dyrrachium (in Latin), Dyrrachion (in Greek) was struck by a severe earthquake as mentioned at the time by the Byzantine chronicler George Pachymeres.
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Albanopolis Aug 31
Replying to @AlbanologyFacts
Indeed the perçe was worn because it facilitated the beheading by a victorious enemy, the head would be caught by the tuft of hair at the top of the head.
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