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American Museum of Natural History
The American Museum of Natural History is one of the world's preeminent scientific and cultural institutions.
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American Museum of Natural History 2h
Did you know that a group of warthogs is called a sounder? They’re native to the African savanna, where they graze on grasses & roots. Sounders are usually composed of a few females, their young, & often a male. See this sounder in our Hall of African Mammals!
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American Museum of Natural History 8h
Happy birthday to Carl Akeley, born on this day in 1864! He was an explorer & naturalist who used art to celebrate wilderness & to argue for its protection. He’s also considered to be the father of modern taxidermy. Visit the Museum’s Hall of African Mammals to see his work.
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American Museum of Natural History 21h
Walruses are known for their ivory tusks. But newborns enter the world without them, & it’s not until ~14 months that they begin to appear under the top lip. Learn about the life of marine animals at the Milstein Science Series: Ocean Babies event on 5/19:
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American Museum of Natural History May 18
Feeling as colorful as the Red-fan Parrot this weekend? When threatened, it fans out its vibrant neck feathers. Males & females also fan out these come-hither collars during courtship rituals in a display where a pair sways their heads from side to side. [📸: Sham Edmond]🌈
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American Museum of Natural History May 18
This year, focuses on museums as cultural hubs taking on global issues. One key issue today? Climate change. Visit our climate change exhibit to learn about the history of climate change, our warming world, and what it means for future generations.🌎
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American Museum of Natural History May 17
Let the Greater Honeyguide lead you into the sweet weekend. It's named for its clever behavior of guiding larger animals, like honey badgers or even humans, to bee hives to do the work of breaking into them. But honey isn't what it's after—rather, it feasts on the larvae & wax.🍯
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American Museum of Natural History May 17
Did you know that when paleontologist O.C. Marsh first examined Triceratops horn fragments in the 1880s, he thought the fossil was from a bison ancestor & named it Bison alticornis? Upon additional discoveries, he renamed the species Triceratops horridus in 1889. 🦴
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American Museum of Natural History May 17
Replying to @AMNH
Learn more about the beauty, the abundance of life on Earth, and the factors that threaten it, in the Museum’s Hall of Biodiversity. >>
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American Museum of Natural History May 17
Did you know it's Endangered Species Day? Thousands of plants & animal species may be in danger of becoming extinct & disappearing forever—& many are threatened because of human actions. But by creating laws to preserve natural habitats, we may be able to save some of them.
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American Museum of Natural History May 16
What’s that critter? It’s the Philippine sailfin lizard! Growing ~3 ft (91 cm) long, the sizable reptile might be seen lounging on tree branches that hang over water. If threatened, it drops directly into the water below to get away, since it's a skillful swimmer. [📸: gautsch.]
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American Museum of Natural History retweeted
Science Magazine May 16
"Visitors looking for an enormous chomp monster surely won’t be disappointed:" A new exhibition at puts on the most elaborate celebration of biology ever assembled. Read the review from :
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American Museum of Natural History May 16
🚨NEW RESEARCH ALERT! What can corals tell us about 400 years of monsoons? Find out what Museum researchers have learned about long-term changes in climate phenomena by analyzing radiocarbon in a 4.6-meter core of coral. Read here >> [📸: N. Goodkin]
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American Museum of Natural History retweeted
CBC at AMNH May 16
New software release! DotDotGoose is a free, tool for counting objects in images. The tool has broad applications, making it easy to identify, count, and classify objects - ranging from elephants to coral polyps and cells!
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American Museum of Natural History May 16
Replying to @Carltonaut
Lovely shot. Thank you visiting!
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American Museum of Natural History May 16
Replying to @AMNH
🚨It’s our 150th anniversary—and we’re celebrating with archival images! We’d also love to hear from you: share your photos, drawings, or a voice message for a chance to be featured >> (3/3)
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American Museum of Natural History May 16
Replying to @AMNH
These exhibits highlight the diversity of forest communities in a range of locations across North America and present techniques for protecting our forests. The largest of the dioramas (pictured below) showcases Olympia, Washington’s wildlife! (2/3)
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American Museum of Natural History May 16
This Thursday, we’re throwing it back to May 1958. Sixty-one years ago, almost to the day, the Museum’s Hall of North American Forests opened to the public. The original announcement touted that more than 100,000 hours went into preparing the 12 exhibits. (1/3)
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American Museum of Natural History May 15
Did you know that some species of sharks & rays give birth to live young? Some sharks even produce placental “milk” to nourish developing fetuses. Learn more about marine animals at the Milstein Science Series: Ocean Babies event on 5/19. >> [📸:Max Pixel]
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American Museum of Natural History May 15
Are your mornings getting brighter earlier? The amount of daylight we experience varies during the year (& depends on our locale). Right now, the N. Hemisphere has longer days than the S. Hemisphere. Find out why Earth’s tilt is the reason for the seasons:
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American Museum of Natural History May 15
Happy birthday to Maria Reiche, born on this day in 1903 & known as the Lady of the Lines—the Nasca lines. Reiche dedicated her life to mapping & protecting the mysterious prehistoric Peruvian geoglyphs, some of which she thought may have represented constellations. [📸:D. Delso]
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