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AEN
AEN remark: We should be skeptical of all sensational finds and this underscores the need for scientific surveying, where discoveries are properly documented. On Basalt at least, fakes are easier to identify. Compare the patina of this 2015 text with the yazid inscription.
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orbi 1 May 18
Replying to @AENJournal
What tools are needed to make an inscription in basalt? A simple knife wouldn't do I guess?
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AEN 1 May 18
Replying to @kwo_vadis
Today, yes. In former times, carving a graffito would have been a waste of a good knife. Inscriptions were mostly carved using other rocks, flint, for example. Flint produces finely incised texts while a text could be chisseled or pounded crudely with another peice of basalt.
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Dr. Abdullah M. Alsharekh 1 May 18
In a strict sense, those could not be called fakes, as they represent personal names with recent dates in Gregorian calendar. It is, unfortunately, a common sight when the location of ancient and are close to towns or near popular camping spots.
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AEN 1 May 18
Thank you! We were not calling them fakes but showing that it one faked an inscription today the patina would resemble these modern ones.
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