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WRC
Worker Rights Consortium is an independent labor rights monitor that conducts factory investigations and helps workers around the world protect their rights.
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WRC May 15
Replying to @ILRF
And read 's full report on the success of the Accord's complaint mechanism, "Calling for Remedy," here:
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WRC May 15
Replying to @cleanclothes @ILRF
Read , , MSN, and the WRC's press release with more info on the Accord's complaint mechanism here:
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WRC May 15
Replying to @ILRF
Our colleagues at published a report today on the success of the Accord's complaint mechanism. Because the Accord promptly and effectively responds to these complaints -- about safety hazards and other violations of workers' rights -- workers trust and use it.
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WRC May 15
Replying to @banglaccord
Before the , virtually no garment factory in Bangladesh had a safe fire exit. Now, the large majority of Accord-covered factories do. And thousands of other safety hazards, from unsafe electrical wiring to inadequate structural columns, have been eliminated.
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WRC May 15
Today marks the 6th anniversary of the signing of the original Bangladesh Accord. The Accord has transformed safety across Bangladesh's garment industry, leading to over 100,000 safety repairs across 1,600+ covered factories
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WRC retweeted
❕Eric Dirnbach❕ Apr 29
"Unfortunately for the country’s garment workers, there is a yawning gap between the brands’ ethical pretentions and the workplace reality for the people sewing their clothes."
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WRC Apr 29
Replying to @4WorkerRights
In response to workers' largely peaceful protests calling for an increase in the minimum wage ($.45/hour), garment factory owners and the government have carried out a brutal, violent crackdown. Our full report is available here:
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WRC Apr 29
recently appeared on (~38:00) to talk about our recent report on the ongoing crackdown in Bangladesh.
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WRC retweeted
Kieran Guilbert Apr 16
Workers in Ethiopian factories supplying the fashion giant PVH are forced to do unpaid overtime, lose pay for drinking water, and earn as little as 12 cents an hour, according to | Latest on for by
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WRC Apr 24
On the 6th anniversary of the building collapse, global investors are concerned that ending the work of the Accord prematurely will jeopardize the safety of garment workers. Read 's statement here:
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WRC Apr 24
While safety in -covered garment factories has improved drastically, building safety hazards continue to put lives at risk elsewhere. The continued operation of the is necessary in order to avoid tragedies like .
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WRC Apr 24
Six years ago today, the building in Bangladesh collapsed, killing 1,138 workers and injuring more than 2,000. This tragedy throws into stark relief the crucial need for enforceable and binding building safety agreements like the :
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WRC Apr 23
Denying workers access to restroom facilities places their health at risk and constitutes a form of psychological abuse. This was only one of the many abuses that garment workers in related to the WRC:
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WRC Apr 22
The government and manufacturers in are betting that Western brands/retailers care a great deal about prices and very little about labor standards. The brands’/retailers’ response to the crackdown will show whether this assumption is correct.
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WRC Apr 16
Check out our full report here:
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WRC Apr 16
Our report on the Bangladeshi government's brutal crackdown on garment workers in retaliation for largely peaceful protests documents the most extensive repression the WRC has observed in two decades of work in Bangladesh:
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WRC Apr 16
Unfortunately for Ethiopian garment workers, our recent report illustrates the yawning gap between the brands’ claims of "doing well by doing good" and the workplace reality for the people sewing their clothes:
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WRC Apr 11
Replying to @4WorkerRights
Read more in our full report on DSA here:
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WRC Apr 11
Replying to @4WorkerRights
This is proactive outreach is rare, and commendable. The WRC and our allies have spent many years working to change brands' expectations about their responsibilities towards the workers who make their clothing. This case demonstrates those expectations are indeed changing
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WRC Apr 11
Replying to @4WorkerRights
Workers were owed an avg of $1950 each. But the factory had not saved enough to pay them the severance they were owed. In this case, the licensee, Fanatics, contacted us directly when they learned about the closure & committed to ensuring the workers were paid -- and they did so
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