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The Economist 1843
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The Economist 1843 11h
Candice Carty-Williams has spoken about how important it is for young black women to see their own experiences reflected in fiction
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The Economist 1843 retweeted
Rachel Lloyd 15h
I wrote about “Queenie”, ’s bestselling debut novel, for
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The Economist 1843 17h
Giftedness may be linked with physiological conditions such as food allergies, asthma and autoimmune diseases
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The Economist 1843 May 18
People’s IQs are fixed throughout their life. Reading Nietzsche to your five-year-old cannot “make” a genius
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The Economist 1843 May 18
A rally of Viennese Harley Davidson riders recently made a detour to the Dackelmuseum in Bavaria, the world’s first museum to be dedicated to the sausage dog
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The Economist 1843 May 18
Its managers think carefully about how the Katikies hotel will look on guests’ Instagram feeds. Sunbeds and tables are positioned to give the best views, and someone is even employed full-time to top up the brilliant white paint of the walls
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The Economist 1843 May 18
Without meaning to, gifted children may come across as smart-arses who, even with the best of intentions, other kids and adults may simply not wish to be around
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The Economist 1843 May 18
In Bern, Switzerland, many residents have built cat ladders to help their feline friends make the descent from high windows and balconies
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The Economist 1843 May 17
Meet the panic-room maker to the stars
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The Economist 1843 May 17
Over 50 years ago, Jean Vanier began living with two men with learning disabilities. This was when he began to understand what it meant to be really human
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The Economist 1843 May 17
Stanley Kubrick recorded the sound of a typist hammering out the words “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy”, because he thought the sound each key made on a typewriter was slightly different
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The Economist 1843 retweeted
The Economist May 15
A single cyclone could knock out Madagascar's entire vanilla crop. The country grows 80% of the world's supply
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The Economist 1843 May 17
The dachshund’s popularity plummeted in America during and after the wars, despite the efforts of some Americans to rebrand it as the “liberty dog”
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The Economist 1843 May 17
Replying to @yuribcn @Pla_shoes
Oops! Thanks for letting us know, we'll update it online.
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The Economist 1843 May 17
A quirky new museum in Germany tells the history of the dachshund. 1843 takes the long view
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The Economist 1843 May 16
Hot dogs! Inside the world’s first dachshund museum
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The Economist 1843 May 16
The woman who thinks we need to start talking about death
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The Economist 1843 May 15
What happens when children are too clever?
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The Economist 1843 May 15
At the time of writing, the tag has appeared in more than five million Instagram posts
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The Economist 1843 retweeted
Leo Robson May 15
I spent some time with the novelist James Ellroy earlier this year for :
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